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Donna Benjamin: I said, let me tell you now

Sat, 2018-03-10 10:02
Saturday, March 10, 2018 - 09:56

Ever since I heard this month’s #AusGlamBlog theme was “Happiness” I’ve had that Happy song stuck in my head.

“Clap along if you know what happiness is to you”

I’m new to the library world as a professional, but not new to libraries. A sequence of fuzzy memories swirl in my mind when I think of libraries.

First, was my local public library children’s cave filled with books that glittered with colour like jewels.

Next, I recall the mesmerising tone and timbre of the librarian’s voice at primary school. Each week she transported us into a different story as we sat, cross legged in front of her, in some form of rapture.

Coming into closer focus I recall opening drawers in the huge wooden catalogue in the library at high school. Breathing in the deeply lovely, dusty air wafting up whilst flipping through those tiny cards was a tactile delight. Some cards were handwritten, some typewritten, some plastered with laser printed stickers.

And finally, I remember relishing the peace and quiet afforded by booking one of 49 carrel study booths at La Trobe University.

I love libraries. Libraries make me happy.

The loss of libraries makes me sad. I think of Alexandria, and more recently in Timbuktu, and closer to home, I mourn the libraries lost to the dreaming by the ravages of destructive colonial force on this little continent so many of us now call home.

Preservation and digitisation, and open collections give me hope. There can only ever be one precious original of a thing, but facsimiles, and copies and 3D blueprints increasingly means physical things can now too be shared and studied without needing to handle, or risk damaging the original.

Sending precious things from collection to collection is fraught with danger. The revelations of what Australian customs did to priceless plant specimens from France & New Zealand still gives me goosebumps of horror.

Digital. Copies. Catalogues, Circulation, Fines, Holds, Reserves, and Serial patterns. I’m learning new things about the complexities under the surface as I start to work seriously with the Koha Community Integrated Library System. I first learned about the Koha ILS more than a decade ago, but I'm only now getting a chance to work with it. It brings my secret love of libraries and my publicly proclaimed love of open source together in a way I still can’t believe is possible.

So yeah.

OH HAI! I’m Donna, and I’m here to help.

“Clap along if you feel like that's what you wanna do”

OpenSTEM: Amelia Earhart in the news

Fri, 2018-03-09 16:05
Recently Amelia Earhart has been in the news once more, with publication of a paper by an American forensic anthropologist, Richard Jantz. Jantz has done an analysis of the measurements made of bones found in 1940 on the island of Nikumaroro Island in Kiribati. Unfortunately, the bones no longer survive, but they were analysed in […]

Craig Sanders: brawndo-installer

Wed, 2018-03-07 18:04

Tired of being oppressed by the slack-arse distro package maintainers who waste time testing that new versions don’t break anything and then waste even more time integrating software into the system?

Well, so am I. So I’ve fixed it, and it was easy to do. Here’s the ultimate installation tool for any program:

brawndo() { curl $1 | sudo /usr/bin/env bash }

I’ve never written a shell script before in my entire life, I spend all my time writing javascript or ruby or python – but shell’s not a real language so it can’t be that hard to get right, can it? Of course not, and I just proved it with the amazing brawndo installer (It’s got what users crave – it’s got electrolyes!)

So next time some lame sysadmin recommends that you install the packaged version of something, just ask them if apt-get or yum or whatever loser packaging tool they’re suggesting has electrolytes. That’ll shut ’em up.

brawndo-installer is a post from: Errata

Linux Users of Victoria (LUV) Announce: LUV March 2018 Workshop: Comparing window managers

Wed, 2018-03-07 18:03
Start: Mar 17 2018 12:30 End: Mar 17 2018 16:30 Start: Mar 17 2018 12:30 End: Mar 17 2018 16:30 Location:  Infoxchange, 33 Elizabeth St. Richmond Link:  http://luv.asn.au/meetings/map

Comparing window managers

We'll be looking at several of the many window managers available on Linux.

We're still looking for more people who can talk about the window manager they are using, what they like and dislike about it, and maybe demonstrate a little.

Please email me at <president@luv.asn.au> with the name of your window manager if you think you could help!

The meeting will be held at Infoxchange, 33 Elizabeth St. Richmond 3121.  Late arrivals please call (0421) 775 358 for access to the venue.

LUV would like to acknowledge Infoxchange for the venue.

Linux Users of Victoria is a subcommittee of Linux Australia.

March 17, 2018 - 12:30

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Simon Lyall: Audiobooks – Background and February 2018 list

Wed, 2018-03-07 10:03

Audiobooks

I started listening to audiobooks around the start of January 2017 when I started walking to work (I previously caught the bus and read a book or on my phone).

I currently get them for free from the Auckland Public Library using the Overdrive app on Android. However while I download them to my phone using the Overdrive app I listen to the using Listen Audiobook Player . I switched to the alternative player mainly since it supports playback speeds greater the 2x normal.

I’ve been posting a list the books I listened to at the end of each month to twitter ( See list from Jan 2018, Dec 2017, Nov 2017 ) but I thought I’d start posting them here too.

I mostly listen to history with some science fiction and other topics.

Books listened to in February 2018

The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu – Pretty good Sci-Fi and towards the hard-core end I like. Looking forward to the sequels 7/10

Destiny and Power: The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush by Jon Meacham – A very nicely done biography, comprehensive and giving a good positive picture of Bush. 7/10

Starship Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein – A pretty good version of the classic. The story works well although the politics are “different”. Enjoyable though 8/10

Uncommon People: The Rise and Fall of the Rock Stars 1955-1994 by David Hepworth – Read by the Author (who sounds like a classic Brit journalist). A Story or two plus a playlist from every year. Fascinating and delightful 9/10

The Long Haul: A Trucker’s Tales of Life on the Road by Finn Murphy – Very interesting and well written about the author’s life as a long distance mover. 8/10

Mornings on Horseback – David McCullough – The Early life of Teddy Roosevelt, my McCullough book for the month. Interesting but not as engaging as I’d have hoped. 7/10

The Battle of the Atlantic: How the Allies Won the War – Jonathan Dimbleby – Overview of the Atlantic Campaign of World War 2. The author works to stress it was on of the most important fronts and does pretty well 7/10

 

 

 

Russell Coker: WordPress Multisite on Debian

Mon, 2018-03-05 20:02

WordPress (a common CMS for blogs) is designed to be copied to a directory that Apache can serve and run by a user with no particular privileges while managing installation of it’s own updates and plugins. Debian is designed around the idea of the package management system controlling everything on behalf of a sysadmin.

When I first started using WordPress there was a version called “WordPress MU” (Multi User) which supported multiple blogs. It was a separate archive to the main WordPress and didn’t support all the plugins and themes. As a main selling point of WordPress is the ability to select from the significant library of plugins and themes this was a serious problem.

Debian WordPress

The people who maintain the Debian package of WordPress have always supported multiple blogs on one system and made it very easy to run in that manner. There’s a /etc/wordpress directory for configuration files for each blog with names such as config-etbe.coker.com.au.php. This allows having multiple separate blogs running from the same tree of PHP source which means only one thing to update when there’s a new version of WordPress (often fixing security issues).

One thing that appears to be lacking with the Debian system is separate directories for “media”. WordPress supports uploading images (which are scaled to several different sizes) as well as sound and apparently video. By default under Debian they are stored in /var/lib/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/YYYY/MM/filename. If you have several blogs on one system they all get to share the same directory tree, that may be OK for one person running multiple blogs but is obviously bad when several bloggers have independent blogs on the same server.

Multisite

If you enable the “multisite” support in WordPress then you have WordPress support for multiple blogs. The administrator of the multisite configuration has the ability to specify media paths etc for all the child blogs.

The first problem with this is that one person has to be the multisite administrator. As I’m the sysadmin of the WordPress servers in question that’s an obvious task for me. But the problem is that the multisite administrator doesn’t just do sysadmin tasks such as specifying storage directories. They also do fairly routine tasks like enabling plugins. Preventing bloggers from installing new plugins is reasonable and is the default Debian configuration. Preventing them from selecting which of the installed plugins are activated is unreasonable in most situations.

The next issue is that some core parts of WordPress functionality on the sub-blogs refer to the administrator blog, recovering a forgotten password is one example. I don’t want users of other blogs on the system to be referred to my blog when they forget their password.

A final problem with multisite is that it makes things more difficult if you want to move a blog to another system. Instead of just sending a dump of the MySQL database and a copy of the Apache configuration for the site you have to configure it for which blog will be it’s master. If going between multisite and non-multisite you have to change some of the data about accounts, this will be annoying on both adding new sites to a server and moving sites from the server to a non-multisite server somewhere else.

I now believe that WordPress multisite has little value for people who use Debian. The Debian way is the better way.

So I had to back out the multisite changes. Fortunately I had a cron job to make snapshots of the BTRFS subvolume that has the database so it was easy to revert to an older version of the MySQL configuration.

Upload Location

update etbe_options set option_value='/var/lib/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/etbe.coker.com.au' where option_name='upload_path';

It turns out that if you don’t have a multisite blog then there’s no way of changing the upload directory without using SQL. The above SQL code is an example of how to do this. Note that it seems that there is special case handling of a value of ‘wp-content/uploads‘ and any other path needs to be fully qualified.

For my own blog however I choose to avoid the WordPress media management and use the following shell script to create suitable HTML code for an image that links to a high resolution version. I use GIMP to create the smaller version of the image which gives me a lot of control over how to crop and compress the image to ensure that enough detail is visible while still being small enough for fast download.

#!/bin/bash set -e if [ "$BASE" = "" ]; then   BASE="http://www.coker.com.au/blogpics/2018" fi while [ "$1" != "" ]; do   BIG=$1   SMALL=$(echo $1 | sed -s s/-big//)   RES=$(identify $SMALL|cut -f3 -d\ )   WIDTH=$(($(echo $RES|cut -f1 -dx)/2))px   HEIGHT=$(($(echo $RES|cut -f2 -dx)/2))px   echo "<a href=\"$BASE/$BIG\"><img src=\"$BASE/$SMALL\" width=\"$WIDTH\" height=\"$HEIGHT\" alt=\"\" /></a>"   shift done

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Russell Coker: Compromised Guest Account

Mon, 2018-03-05 14:02

Some of the workstations I run are sometimes used by multiple people. Having multiple people share an account is bad for security so having a guest account for guest access is convenient.

If a system doesn’t allow logins over the Internet then a strong password is not needed for the guest account.

If such a system later allows logins over the Internet then hostile parties can try to guess the password. This happens even if you don’t use the default port for ssh.

This recently happened to a system I run. The attacker logged in as guest, changed the password, and installed a cron job to run every minute and restart their blockchain mining program if it had been stopped.

In 2007 a bug was filed against the Debian package openssh-server requesting that the AllowUsers be added to the default /etc/ssh/sshd_config file [1]. If that bug hadn’t been marked as “wishlist” and left alone for 11 years then I would probably have set it to only allow ssh connections to the one account that I desired which always had a strong password.

I’ve been a sysadmin for about 25 years (since before ssh was invented). I have been a Debian Developer for almost 20 years, including working on security related code. The fact that I stuffed up in regard to this issue suggests that there are probably many other people making similar mistakes, and probably most of them aren’t monitoring things like system load average and temperature which can lead to the discovery of such attacks.

Related posts:

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  3. Can you run SE Linux on a Xen Guest? I was asked “Can you run SELinux on a XEN...

Francois Marier: Redirecting an entire site except for the certbot webroot

Fri, 2018-03-02 15:41

In order to be able to use the webroot plugin for certbot and automatically renew the Let's Encrypt certificate for libravatar.org, I had to put together an Apache config that would do the following on port 80:

  • Let /.well-known/acme-challenge/* through on the bare domain (http://libravatar.org/).
  • Redirect anything else to https://www.libravatar.org/.

The reason for this is that the main Libravatar service listens on www.libravatar.org and not libravatar.org, but that cerbot needs to ascertain control of the bare domain.

This is the configuration I ended up with:

<VirtualHost *:80> DocumentRoot /var/www/acme <Directory /var/www/acme> Options -Indexes </Directory> RewriteEngine on RewriteCond "/var/www/acme%{REQUEST_URI}" !-f RewriteRule ^(.*)$ https://www.libravatar.org/ [last,redirect=301] </VirtualHost>

The trick I used here is to make the redirection RewriteRule conditional on the requested file (%{REQUEST_URI}) not existing in the /var/www/acme directory, the one where I tell certbot to drop its temporary files.

Here are the relevant portions of /etc/letsencrypt/renewal/www.libravatar.org.conf:

[renewalparams] authenticator = webroot account = <span class="createlink"><a href="/ikiwiki.cgi?do=create&amp;from=posts%2Fredirecting-entire-site-except-certbot-webroot&amp;page=webroot_map" rel="nofollow">?</a>webroot map</span> libravatar.org = /var/www/acme www.libravatar.org = /var/www/acme

Lev Lafayette: Drupal "Access denied" Message

Tue, 2018-02-27 16:04

It happens rarely enough, but on occasion (such as an upgrade to a database system (e.g., MySQL, MariaDB) or system version of a web-scripting language (e.g., PHP), you can end up with one's Drupal site failing to load, displaying only the error message similar to:


PDOException: SQLSTATE[HY000] [1044] Access denied for user 'username'@'localhost' to database 'database' in lock_may_be_available() (line 167 of /website/includes/lock.inc).

The cryptic introduction to the error message actually describes what the problem is, as error messages usually do. However, also like a lot of error messages it really doesn't provide an immediately obvious solution. So the problem is that a lock has been initiated on username@localhost, and because of the database cannot be accessed, and therefore the site won't load.

This is different to similar error messages, such as:


PDOException: SQLSTATE[08004] [1040] Too many connections in lock_may_be_available() (line 167 of /website/includes/lock.inc).

Which again, means what it says, and will probably need more file system space, clearing cache etc.

The blunt trauma method to solve the problem at hand however is to remove the offending user and recreate it. However before one does the usual rules about site and database backups apply. Unless you're feeling confident, and we know what confidence means in monkeying around with production databases.

The username, database, and password will be stored in Drupal's site located in sites/default/settings.php. Recreate the user and ... now what was their privileges again? If these haven't been set the result will be similar to:

Warning: PDO::__construct(): The server requested authentication method unknown to the client [mysql_old_password] in DatabaseConnection->__construct() (line 304 of /website/includes/database/database.inc).

To fix this, grant the user the appropriate privileges. In MySQL/MariaDB etc this will be


GRANT SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, CREATE, DROP, INDEX, ALTER, CREATE TEMPORARY TABLES ON database.* TO 'user'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';

And hopefully this short post will save someone else a bit of time.

OpenSTEM: At Mercy of the Weather

Mon, 2018-02-26 14:05
It is the time of year when Australia often experiences extreme weather events. February is renowned as the hottest month and, in some parts of the country, also the wettest month. It often brings cyclones to our coasts and storms, which conversely enough, may trigger fires as lightening strikes the hot, dry bush. Aboriginal people […]

Chris Samuel: Vale Dad

Sun, 2018-02-25 22:01

[I’ve been very quiet here for over a year for reasons that will become apparent in the next few days when I finish and publish a long post I’ve been working on for a while – difficult to write, hence the delay]

It’s 10 years ago today that my Dad died, and Alan and I lost the father who had meant so much to both of us. It’s odd realising that it’s over 1/5th of my life since he died, it doesn’t seem that long.

Vale dad, love you…

This item originally posted here:

Vale Dad

Linux Users of Victoria (LUV) Announce: LUV Main March 2018 Meeting: Unions - Hacking society's operating system

Sat, 2018-02-24 20:03
Start: Mar 6 2018 18:30 End: Mar 6 2018 20:30 Start: Mar 6 2018 18:30 End: Mar 6 2018 20:30 Location:  Mail Exchange Hotel, 688 Bourke St, Melbourne VIC 3000 Link:  http://mailexchangehotel.com.au/

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

6:30 PM to 8:30 PM
Mail Exchange Hotel
688 Bourke St, Melbourne VIC 3000

Speakers:

Mail Exchange Hotel, 688 Bourke St, Melbourne VIC 3000

Food and drinks will be available on premises.

Linux Users of Victoria is a subcommittee of Linux Australia.

March 6, 2018 - 18:30

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Tim Serong: Strange Bedfellows

Sat, 2018-02-24 02:05

The Tasmanian state election is coming up in a week’s time, and I’ve managed to do a reasonable job of ignoring the whole horrible thing, modulo the promoted tweets, the signs on the highway, the junk the major (and semi-major) political parties pay to dump in my letterbox, and occasional discussions with friends and neighbours.

Promoted tweets can be blocked. The signs on the highway can (possibly) be re-purposed for a subsequent election, or can be pulled down and used for minor windbreak/shelter works for animal enclosures. Discussions with friends and neighbours are always interesting, even if one doesn’t necessarily agree. I think the most irritating thing is the letterbox junk; at best it’ll eventually be recycled, at worst it becomes landfill or firestarters (and some of those things do make very satisfying firestarters).

Anyway, as I live somewhere in the wilds division of Franklin, I thought I’d better check to see who’s up for election here. There’s no independents running this time, so I’ve essentially got the choice of four parties; Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Tasmania, Tasmanian Greens, Tasmanian Labor and Tasmanian Liberals (the order here is the same as on the TEC web site; please don’t infer any preference based on the order in which I list parties in this blog post).

I feel like I should be setting party affiliations aside and voting for individuals, but of the sixteen candidates listed, to the best of my knowledge I’ve only actually met and spoken with two of them. Another I noticed at random in a cafe, and I was ignored by a fourth who was milling around with some cronies at a promotional stand out the front of Woolworths in Huonville a few weeks ago. So, party affiliations it is, which leads to an interesting thought experiment.

When you read those four party names above, what things came most immediately to mind? For me, it was something like this:

  • Shooters, Fishers & Farmers: Don’t take our guns. Fuck those bastard Greenies.
  • Tasmanian Greens: Protect the natural environment. Renewable energy. Try not to kill anything. Might collaborate with Labor. Liberals are big money and bad news.
  • Tasmanian Labor: Mellifluous babble concerning health, education, housing, jobs, pokies and something about workers rights. Might collaborate with the Greens. Vehemently opposed to the Liberals.
  • Tasmanian Liberals: Mellifluous babble concerning jobs, health, infrastructure, safety and the Tasmanian way of life, peppered with something about small business and family values. Vehemently opposed to Labor and the Greens.

And because everyone usually automatically thinks in terms of binaries (e.g. good vs. evil, wrong vs. right, one vs. zero), we tend to end up imagining something like this:

  • Shooters, Fishers & Farmers vs. Greens
  • Labor vs. Liberal
  • …um. Maybe Labor and the Greens might work together…
  • …but really, it’s going to be Labor or Liberal in power (possibly with some sort of crossbench or coalition support from minor parties, despite claims from both that it’ll be majority government all the way).

It turns out that thinking in binaries is remarkably unhelpful, unless you’re programming a computer (it’s zeroes and ones all the way down), or are lost in the wilderness (is this plant food or poison? is this animal predator or prey?) The rest of the time, things tend to be rather more colourful (or grey, depending on your perspective), which leads back to my thought experiment: what do these “naturally opposed” parties have in common?

According to their respective web sites, the Shooters, Fishers & Farmers and the Greens have many interests in common, including agriculture, biosecurity, environmental protection, tourism, sustainable land management, health, education, telecommunications and addressing homelessness. There are differences in the policy details of course (some really are diametrically opposed), but in broad strokes these two groups seem to care strongly about – and even agree on – many of the same things.

Similarly, Labor and Liberal are both keen to tell a story about putting the people of Tasmania first, about health, education, housing, jobs and infrastructure. Honestly, for me, they just kind of blend into one another; sure there’s differences in various policy details, but really if someone renamed them Labal and Liberor I wouldn’t notice. These two are the status quo, and despite fighting it out with each other repeatedly, are, essentially, resting on their laurels.

Here’s what I’d like to see: a minority Tasmanian state government formed from a coalition of the Tasmanian Greens plus the Shooters, Fishers & Farmers party, with the Labor and Liberal parties together in opposition. It’ll still be stuck in that irritating Westminster binary mode, but at least the damn thing will have been mixed up sufficiently that people might actually talk to each other rather than just fighting.

Russell Coker: Dell PowerEdge T30

Fri, 2018-02-23 02:02

I just did a Debian install on a Dell PowerEdge T30 for a client. The Dell web site is a bit broken at the moment, it didn’t list the price of that server or give useful specs when I was ordering it. I was under the impression that the server was limited to 8G of RAM, that’s unusually small but it wouldn’t be the first time a vendor crippled a low end model to drive sales of more expensive systems. It turned out that the T30 model I got has 4*DDR4 sockets with only one used for an 8G DIMM. It apparently can handle up to 64G of RAM.

It has space for 4*3.5″ SATA disks but only has 4*SATA connectors on the motherboard. As I never use the DVD in a server this isn’t a problem for me, but if you want 4 disks and a DVD then you need to buy a PCI or PCIe SATA card.

Compared to the PowerEdge T130 I’m using at home the new T30 is slightly shorter and thinner while seeming to have more space inside. This is partly due to better design and partly due to having 2 hard drives in the top near the DVD drive which are a little inconvenient to get to. The T130 I have (which isn’t the latest model) has 4*3.5″ SATA drive bays at the bottom which are very convenient for swapping disks.

It has two PCIe*16 slots (one of which is apparently quad speed), one shorter PCIe slot, and a PCI slot. For a cheap server a PCI slot is a nice feature, it means I can use an old PCI Ethernet card instead of buying a PCIe Ethernet card. The T30 cost $1002 so using an old Ethernet card saved 1% of the overall cost.

The T30 seems designed to be more of a workstation or personal server than a straight server. The previous iterations of the low end tower servers from Dell didn’t have built in sound and had PCIe slots that were adequate for a RAID controller but vastly inadequate for video. This one has built in line in and out for audio and has two DisplayPort connectors on the motherboard (presumably for dual-head support). Apart from the CPU (an E3-1225 which is slower than some systems people are throwing out nowadays) the system would be a decent gaming system.

It has lots of USB ports which is handy for a file server, I can attach lots of backup devices. Also most of the ports support “super speed”, I haven’t yet tested out USB devices that support such speeds but I’m looking forward to it. It’s a pity that there are no USB-C ports.

One deficiency of the T30 is the lack of a VGA port. It has one HDMI and two DisplayPort sockets on the motherboard, this is really great for a system on or under your desk, any monitor you would want on your desk will support at least one of those interfaces. But in a server room you tend to have an old VGA monitor that’s there because no-one wants it on their desk. Not supporting VGA may force people to buy a $200 monitor for their server room. That increases the effective cost of the system by 20%. It has a PC serial port on the motherboard which is a nice server feature, but that doesn’t make up for the lack of VGA.

The BIOS configuration has an option displayed for enabling charging devices from USB sockets when a laptop is in sleep mode. It’s disappointing that they didn’t either make a BIOS build for a non-laptop or have the BIOS detect at run-time that it’s not on laptop hardware and hide that.

Conclusion

The PowerEdge T30 is a nice low-end workstation. If you want a system with ECC RAM because you need it to be reliable and you don’t need the greatest performance then it will do very well. It has Intel video on the motherboard with HDMI and DisplayPort connectors, this won’t be the fastest video but should do for most workstation tasks. It has a PCIe*16 quad speed slot in case you want to install a really fast video card. The CPU is slow by today’s standards, but Dell sells plenty of tower systems that support faster CPUs.

It’s nice that it has a serial port on the motherboard. That could be used for a serial console or could be used to talk to a UPS or other server-room equipment. But that doesn’t make up for the lack of VGA support IMHO.

One could say that a tower system is designed to be a desktop or desk-side system not run in any sort of server room. However it is cheaper than any rack mounted systems from Dell so it will be deployed in lots of small businesses that have one server for everything – I will probably install them in several other small businesses this year. Also tower servers do end up being deployed in server rooms, all it takes is a small business moving to a serviced office that has a proper server room and the old tower servers end up in a rack.

Rack vs Tower

One reason for small businesses to use tower servers when rack servers are more appropriate is the issue of noise. If your “server room” is the room that has your printer and fax then it typically won’t have a door and you just can’t have the noise of a rack mounted server in there. 1RU systems are inherently noisy because the small diameter of the fans means that they have to spin fast. 2RU systems can be made relatively quiet if you don’t have high-end CPUs but no-one seems to be trying to do that.

I think it would be nice if a company like Dell sold low-end servers in a rack mount form-factor (19 inches wide and 2RU high) that were designed to be relatively quiet. Then instead of starting with a tower server and ending up with tower systems in racks a small business could start with a 19 inch wide system on a shelf that gets bolted into a rack if they move into a better office. Any laptop CPU from the last 10 years is capable of running a file server with 8 disks in a ZFS array. Any modern laptop CPU is capable of running a file server with 8 SSDs in a ZFS array. This wouldn’t be difficult to design.

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Colin Charles: MariaDB Developer’s unconference & M|18

Wed, 2018-02-21 14:02

Been a while since I wrote anything MySQL/MariaDB related here, but there’s the column on the Percona blog, that has weekly updates.

Anyway, I’ll be at the developer’s unconference this weekend in NYC. Even managed to snag a session on the schedule, MySQL features missing in MariaDB Server (Sunday, 12.15–13.00). Signup on meetup?

Due to the prevalence of “VIP tickets”, I too signed up for M|18. If you need a discount code, I’ll happily offer them up to you to see if they still work (though I’m sure a quick Google will solve this problem for you). I’ll publish notes, probably in my weekly column.

If you’re in New York and want to say hi, talk shop, etc. don’t hesitate to drop me a line.

Pia Waugh: An optimistic future

Sun, 2018-02-18 06:01

This is my personal vision for an event called “Optimistic Futures” to explore what we could be aiming for and figure out the possible roles for government in future.

Technology is both an enabler and a disruptor in our lives. It has ushered in an age of surplus, with decentralised systems enabled by highly empowered global citizens, all creating increasing complexity. It is imperative that we transition into a more open, collaborative, resilient and digitally enabled society that can respond exponentially to exponential change whilst empowering all our people to thrive. We have the means now by which to overcome our greatest challenges including poverty, hunger, inequity and shifting job markets but we must be bold in collectively designing a better future, otherwise we may unintentionally reinvent past paradigms and inequities with shiny new things.

Technology is only as useful as it affects actual people, so my vision starts, perhaps surprisingly for some, with people. After all, if people suffer, the system suffers, so the well being of people is the first and foremost priority for any sustainable vision. But we also need to look at what all sectors and communities across society need and what part they can play:

  • People: I dream of a future where the uniqueness of local communities, cultures and individuals is amplified, where diversity is embraced as a strength, and where all people are empowered with the skills, capacity and confidence to thrive locally and internationally. A future where everyone shares in the benefits and opportunities of a modern, digital and surplus society/economy with resilience, and where everyone can meaningfully contribute to the future of work, local communities and the national/global good.
  • Public sectors: I dream of strong, independent, bold and highly accountable public sectors that lead, inform, collaborate, engage meaningfully and are effective enablers for society and the economy. A future where we invest as much time and effort on transformational digital public infrastructure and skills as we do on other public infrastructure like roads, health and traditional education, so that we can all build on top of government as a platform. Where everyone can have confidence in government as a stabilising force of integrity that provides a minimum quality of life upon which everyone can thrive.
  • The media: I dream of a highly effective fourth estate which is motivated systemically with resilient business models that incentivise behaviours to both serve the public and hold power to account, especially as “news” is also arguably becoming exponential. Actionable accountability that doesn’t rely on the linearity and personal incentives of individuals to respond will be critical with the changing pace of news and with more decisions being made by machines.
  • Private, academic and non-profit sectors: I dream of a future where all sectors can more freely innovate, share, adapt and succeed whilst contributing meaningfully to the public good and being accountable to the communities affected by decisions and actions. I also see a role for academic institutions in particular, given their systemic motivation for high veracity outcomes without being attached to one side, as playing a role in how national/government actions are measured, planned, tested and monitored over time.
  • Finally, I dream of a world where countries are not celebrated for being just “digital nations” but rather are engaged in a race to the top in using technology to improve the lives of all people and to establish truly collaborative democracies where people can meaningfully participate in the shaping the optimistic and inclusive futures.

Technology is a means, not an ends, so we need to use technology to both proactively invent the future we need (thank you Alan Kay) and to be resilient to change including emerging tech and trends.

Let me share a few specific optimistic predictions for 2070:

  • Automation will help us redesign our work expectations. We will have a 10-20 hour work week supported by machines, freeing up time for family, education, civic duties and innovation. People will have less pressure to simply survive and will have more capacity to thrive (this is a common theme, but something I see as critical).
  • 3D printing of synthetic foods and nanotechnology to deconstruct and reconstruct molecular materials will address hunger, access to medicine, clothes and goods, and community hubs (like libraries) will become even more important as distribution, education and social hubs, with drones and other aerial travel employed for those who can’t travel. Exoskeletons will replace scooters
  • With rocket travel normalised, and only an hour to get anywhere on the planet, nations will see competitive citizenships where countries focus on the best quality of life to attract and retain people, rather than largely just trying to attract and retain companies as we do today. We will also likely see the emergence of more powerful transnational communities that have nationhood status to represent the aspects of people’s lives that are not geopolitically bound.
  • The public service has highly professional, empathetic and accountable multi-disciplinary experts on responsive collaborative policy, digital legislation, societal modeling, identifying necessary public digital infrastructure for investment, and well controlled but openly available data, rules and transactional functions of government to enable dynamic and third party services across myriad channels, provided to people based on their needs but under their control. We will also have a large number of citizens working 1 or 2 days a week in paid civic duties on areas where they have passion, skills or experience to contribute.
  • The paralympics will become the main game, as it were, with no limits on human augmentation. We will do the 100m sprint with rockets, judo with cyborgs, rock climbing with tentacles. We have access to medical capabilities to address any form of disease or discomfort but we don’t use the technologies to just comply to a normative view of a human. People are free to choose their form and we culturally value diversity and experimentation as critical attributes of a modern adaptable community.

I’ve only been living in New Zealand a short time but I’ve been delighted and inspired by what I’ve learned from kiwi and Māori cultures, so I’d like to share a locally inspired analogy.

Technology is on one hand, just a waka (canoe), a vehicle for change. We all have a part to play in the journey and in deciding where we want to go. On the other hand, technology is also the winds, the storms, the thunder, and we have to continually work to understand and respond to emerging technologies and trends so we stay safely on course. It will take collaboration and working towards common goals if we are to chart a better future for all.

Donna Benjamin: Site building with Drupal

Sat, 2018-02-17 14:02
Saturday, February 17, 2018 - 14:05What even is "Site Building"?

At DrupalDownunder some years back, the wonderful Erica Bramham named her talk "All node, no code". Nodes were the fundamental building blocks in Drupal, they were like single drops of content. These days though, it's all about entities.

But hang on a minute, I'm using lots of buzz words, and worse, I'm using words that mean different things in different contexts. Jargon is one of the first hurdles you need to jump to understand the diverse worlds of the web. People who grow up multi-lingual learn that the meanings of words is somewhat arbitrary. They learn the same thing has different names. This is true for the web too. So the first thing to know about Site Building, is it means different things to different people. 

To me, it means being able to build a website with out knowing how to code. I also believe it means I can build a website without having to set up my own development environment. I know people who vehemently disagree with me about this. But that's ok. This is my blog, and these are my rules.

So - this is a post about site building, using SimplyTest.Me and Drupal 8 out of the box.

1. Go to https://simplytest.me

2. Type Drupal Core in the search field, and select "Drupal core" from the list

3. Choose the latest development branch, right at the bottom of the list.

 

For me, right now, that's 8.6.x, and here's a screenshot of what that looks like.

 

4. Click "Launch sandbox".

Now wait.

In a few moments, you should see a fresh shiny Drupal 8 site, ready for you to explore.

For me today, it looks like this.  

 

In the top right of the window, you should see a "Log in" link.

Click that, and enter admin/admin to login. 

You're now ready to practice some site building!

First, you'll need to create some content to play with.  Here's a short screencast that shows you how to login, add an article, and change the title using Quick Edit.

A guide to what's next

Follow the Drupal User guide to start building your site!

If you want to start at the beginning, you'll get a great overview of Drupal, and some important info on how to plan your site. But if you want to roll up your sleeves and get building, you can skip the chapter on site installation and jump straight to chapter 4, and dive into basic site configuration.

 

Experiment

You have 24 hours to experiment with the simplytest.me sandbox - after that it disappears.

 

Get in touch

If you want something more permanent, you might want to "try drupal" or contact us at catalyst-au.net to discuss our Drupal services.

Linux Users of Victoria (LUV) Announce: LUV February 2018 Workshop: Installing an Open Source OS on your tablet or phone

Sat, 2018-02-17 12:03
Start: Feb 24 2018 12:30 End: Feb 24 2018 16:30 Start: Feb 24 2018 12:30 End: Feb 24 2018 16:30 Location:  Infoxchange, 33 Elizabeth St. Richmond Link:  http://luv.asn.au/meetings/map

Installing an Open Source OS on your tablet or phone

Andrew Pam will demonstrate how to install LineageOS, previously known as CyanogenMod and based on the Android Open Source Project, on tablets and phones.  Feel free to bring your own tablets and phones and have a go, but please ensure you back them up if there is anything you still need stored on them!

The meeting will be held at Infoxchange, 33 Elizabeth St. Richmond 3121.  Late arrivals please call (0421) 775 358 for access to the venue.

LUV would like to acknowledge Infoxchange for the venue.

Linux Users of Victoria is a subcommittee of Linux Australia.

February 24, 2018 - 12:30

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OpenSTEM: Australia at the Olympics

Sat, 2018-02-17 00:05
The modern Olympic games were started by Frenchman Henri de Baillot-Latour to promote international understanding. The first games of the modern era were held in 1896 in Athens, Greece. Australia has competed in all the Olympic games of the modern era, although our participation in the first one was almost by chance. Of course, the […]

OpenSTEM: Australia Day in the early 20th century

Fri, 2018-02-09 16:05
Australia Day and its commemoration on 26 January, has long been a controversial topic. This year has seen calls once again for the date to be changed. Similar calls have been made for a long time. As early as 1938, Aboriginal civil rights leaders declared a “Day of Mourning” to highlight issues in the Aboriginal […]