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Rusty Russell: Quick Stats on zstandard (zstd) Performance

Thu, 2017-03-09 12:02

Was looking at using zstd for backup, and wanted to see the effect of different compression levels. I backed up my (built) bitcoin source, which is a decent representation of my home directory, but only weighs in 2.3GB. zstd -1 compressed it 71.3%, zstd -22 compressed it 78.6%, and here’s a graph showing runtime (on my laptop) and the resulting size:

zstandard compression (bitcoin source code, object files and binaries) times and sizes

For this corpus, sweet spots are 3 (the default), 6 (2.5x slower, 7% smaller), 14 (10x slower, 13% smaller) and 20 (46x slower, 22% smaller). Spreadsheet with results here.

Binh Nguyen: Prophets/Pre-Cogs/Stargate Program 8, Github Download Script, and More

Wed, 2017-03-08 20:41
Obvious continuation from my previous other posts with regards to prophets/pre-cogs: http://dtbnguyen.blogspot.com/2017/02/life-in-india-prophetspre-cogsstargate_82.html http://dtbnguyen.blogspot.com/2017/02/life-in-iran-examining-prophetspre-cogs.html http://dtbnguyen.blogspot.com/2017/02/life-in-venezuela-examining-prophetspre.html http://dtbnguyen.blogspot.com/2017/01/

Matthew Oliver: pudb debugging tips

Wed, 2017-03-08 12:06

As an OpenStack Swift dev I obviously write a lot of Python. Further Swift is cluster and so it has a bunch of moving pieces. So debugging is very important. Most the time I use pudb and then jump into the PyCharms debugger if get really stuck.

Pudb is curses based version of pdb, and I find it pretty awesome and you can use it while ssh’d somewhere. So I thought I’d write a tips that I use. Mainly so I don’t forget

OpenSTEM: Oceanography and the Continents

Wed, 2017-03-08 10:04

Marie Tharp (30 July, 1920 – 23 August, 2006) was an oceanographer and cartographer who mapped the oceans of the world. She worked with Bruce Heezen, who collected data on a ship, mapping the ocean floor.

Tharp and Heezen

Tharp turned the data into detailed maps. At that time women were not allowed to work on research ships, as it was thought that they would bring bad luck! However, Tharp was a skilled cartographer, and as she made her maps of the floor of the oceans of the world, with their ridges and valleys, she realised that there were deep valleys which showed the boundaries of continental plates. She noticed that these valleys were also places with lots of earthquakes and she became convinced of the basics of plate tectonics and continental drift.

Between 1959 and 1963, Tharp was not mentioned in any of the scientific papers published by Heezen, and he dismissed her theories disparagingly as “girl talk”. As this video  from National Geographic shows, she stuck to her guns and was vindicated by the evidence, eventually managing to persuade Heezen, and the scientific community at large, of the validity of the theories. In 1977, Heezen and Tharp published a map of the entire ocean floor. Tharp obtained degrees in English, Music, Geology and Mathematics during the course of her life. In 2001, a few weeks before her 81st birthday, Marie Tharp was awarded the Lamont-Doherty Heritage Award at Columbia University, in the USA, as a pioneer of oceanography. She died of cancer in 2006.

The National Geographic video provides an excellent testimony to this woman pioneer in oceanography.

Lev Lafayette: Multicore World 2017: A Review

Tue, 2017-03-07 16:05

Multicore World is a small conference held annually in New Zealand hosted by Open Parallel. What it lacks in numbers however it makes up in quality of the presenters. The 2017 conference included a typically impressive array of speakers dealing with some of the most difficult issues facing computational science, and included several important announcements in the fields of supercomputing, the Internet of Things, and manufacting issues.

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