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Matt Palmer: A benefit of running an alternate init in Debian Jessie

Thu, 2014-11-20 17:26

If you’re someone who doesn’t like Debian’s policy of automatically starting on install (or its heinous cousin, the RUN or ENABLE variable in /etc/default/<service>), then running an init system other than systemd should work out nicely.

Donna Benjamin: DrupalSouth - Call for sessions open!! (closes 30 Nov 2014)

Thu, 2014-11-20 09:26
Thursday, November 20, 2014 - 08:49

DrupalSouth is the biggest Drupal gathering in the Antipodes.

We'll be at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre over three days in early March 2015. March 5-7 to be exact.

Find out more at the website

https://melbourne2015.drupal.org.au/

The call for sessions is open, and we're trying hard to get the word out wide and far, to whisper in new ears, and encourage people of all sorts to share their ideas for sessions so we can create a truly wonderful, inspiring, engaging and fun program for this conference!

For those who may not know, Drupal is an open source content management system. It's used by people and organisations all around the world, for all sorts of web sites. It's also being used as back end application framework for mobile apps! It's amazing what Drupal can do.

Drupal events are the heart and soul of the community that makes Drupal. Bringing people together drives the project forward, and forges friendships.

But we're also part of the wider web. So we want to hear from all sorts of web specialists, not just Drupalists.

Please, submit a session, or simply help us spread the word. The deadline is looming and won't be extended. Get that proposal in by 30 November 2014. https://melbourne2015.drupal.org.au/program/session-submission

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Andrew McDonnell, Jim Cheetham

Thu, 2014-11-20 07:28
Andrew McDonnell Reverse engineering embedded software using Radare2

1:20pm Thursday 15th January 2015

Andrew McDonnell is a professional software engineer with two decades experience, having spent many years before that hacking code after receiving a Commodore 64 for Christmas at age 12. He has significant experience programming in C++, Java and Python and a multitude of scripting languages. Outside of family and work he sometimes has time to play with his collection of 8-bit and PC/XT-vintage computers; computing and electronics has always been his passion. He intermittently maintains a blog at http://blog.oldcomputerjunk.net sometimes posting how he solved a problem in the hope it may be useful to someone else.

For more information on Andrew and his presentation, see here. You can follow him as @pastcompute and don’t forget to mention #lca2015.



Jim Cheetham OneRNG - An Open and Verifiable hardware random number generator

1:20pm Thursday 15th January 2015

Jim works in Information Security, and has a long background in Unix/Linux and Open Source/Free software systems.

For more information on Jim and his presentation, see here. You can follow him as @onerng and don’t forget to mention #lca2015.

Jonathan Adamczewski: Unquestionably bad

Wed, 2014-11-19 18:27

Question 5:

Consider the following 6 data structures:

  • Stack
  • Queue
  • Hash table
  • Doubly-linked list
  • Binary search tree
  • Directed acyclic graph

Using these as the subject matter, construct 6 really good puns.

 

Answers:

After receiving a range of questions from different sources, I was unsure which to answer first — I was stack as to where to begin. And so because this was the last question that I received, it became the first that I answered.

Don’t get me wrong — I did appreciate the question. The capacity of my gratitude is, theoretically, unbounded. Thanqueue.

We have a cuckoo aviary. I keyp a record of each birth in a hatch table.

I noticed that I was leaning to one side. I spoke to a physician about it — he told me I was overweight because I was eating too much bread. My list, it seems, is linked to my dough-belly.

On a school trip to a pickle factory, my daughter went missing. I was able to climb the brinery search tree and spot her, though it took longer than I had hoped due to my poor balance.

While out walking, I deflected a cyclist’s gaffe, knocking him aside as he rode the wrong way down a one-way street. I looked down my nose at him and gave a topological snort to help him on his way.

 

The reader may decide whether the answers satisfy the requirements of the question.

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Katie McLaughlin, Andrew Bartlett

Wed, 2014-11-19 04:31
Katie McLaughlin Before All Else, Be Graphed

3:40pm Wednesday 14th January 2015

Katie is a part of the Engineering team at Anchor Systems, working to improve *all* the things. She has a history of enterprise development and Windows system administration, but has been successfully converted to the ways of the penguin in recent years.

When she's not changing the world, she enjoys making tapestries, cooking, and yelling at JavaScript and it's attempts at global variables.

For more information on Katie and her presentation, see here. You can follow her as @glasnt and don’t forget to mention #lca2015.



Andrew Bartlett Pushing users into the pit of success - stories from the Samba 3 -> Samba 4 transition

3:40pm Thursday 15th January 2015

Andrew Bartlett is a Samba Developer currently employed by Catalyst in Wellington, NZ. Andrew has been developing Samba since 2001, and has had a strong focus on the Active Directory DC project for the past decade or so. He is passionate about authentication systems and making Samba a great, interoperable alternative to the dominant implementation from Microsoft.

For more information on Andrew and his presentation, see here.

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 293: Kindergarten, Property Occupations Act Roadshow

Tue, 2014-11-18 22:25

Zoe woke up at some point in the night. I have a vague recollection of a conversation with her, and lacking the willpower to get out of bed to put her back to bed in her own bed. The next thing it was 5:30am and she was sleeping sideways in bed with me.

Despite all that, I felt more rested this morning, which was good. We managed to get going quite early as well, without really trying. I had to be out at the Sleeman Sports Complex at 9am for a roadshow by the REIQ about the new Property Occupations Act, which kicks in on December 1 to replace the current Property Agents and Motor Dealers Act.

It also rained this morning, which doubly made it necessary to go to Kindergarten by car. We were actually running so early that we got there before opening time, which I've only managed to do a few times all year.

I ended up getting to the Sleeman Sports Complex about 15 minutes early. It was fun playing "spot the real estate agent's car".

I didn't learn anything earthshattering in the briefing, but it was useful to get fully up to speed on the new legislation. I just hope that being half way through a course that has covered the old legislation isn't going to be a problem.

I got home from that with enough time to just chill out for a bit (I ended up doing a bit of tinkering) before it was time to pick up Zoe. The weather was still a bit questionable, so I picked her up in the car.

Zoe wanted to watch Megan's tennis lesson again, and I had to be at home for a 3pm video chat, so I left her with Jason and popped home.

After my video chat, I went around to Jason's and helped with a bit of painting before heading home to start on dinner.

I had enough for Jason, Megan and Megan's little sister, so they came over for dinner as well.

I got Zoe down to bed at the normal time, but her bedroom is ridiculously hot. I'm not terribly confident I won't get another uninterrupted night's sleep.

Jeremy Visser: One week with the Nexus 5

Tue, 2014-11-18 18:38

My ageing Motorola Milestone finally received a kick to the bucket last week when my shiny new Nexus 5 phone arrived.

Though fantastic by 2009 standards, the Milestone could only officially run Android 2.2, and 2.3 with the help of an unofficial CyanogenMod port. Having been end-of-lifed for some time now, and barely being able to render a complex web page without running out of memory, it was time for me to move on.

I was adamant that I would only buy a Nexus phone. Vendors that ship OEM customisations to the Android image are the spawn of the devil, and I wasn’t interested in buying a device that would be abandoned after the next model came out. After all, I’m not a gadget person. This is a big deal for me, and I hope this phone lasts me four years, just like my Milestone did.

Can I just say how fantastic the hardware is. The case is much more aesthetically pleasing than most of the Android phones I’ve had the (dis)pleasure of trying out, the screen is beautiful, and the software keyboard is smooth, accurate, and responsive.

On the screen. I think five inches is the maximum size I can cope with. I must say, being a person with small hands, I am not a large screen person. I can only just reach the opposite X axis with my thumb, and I need to reposition my hand (or use a second hand) to reach the opposite X and Y points. So yes, that’s why I didn’t get a Nexus 6.

On the software, I am thoroughly impressed by Android 4.4. Thoroughly. Google have done just about everything right. Nearly anything bad I have ever said about Android in the past either doesn’t apply to Android 4.4, or only applies to customised OEM builds.

Everything I would have wanted to root my phone to do previously is totally unnecessary.

Out of the box, FLAC audio and IPsec Xauth VPNs (main mode only, not aggressive mode) are supported. Just by installing an app, I can get my strongSwan IKEv2 VPN working.

Interestingly enough, this phone constantly bombards me with security warnings as a result of the fact that I have installed my own certificate authorities. I think this is an interesting development, and is probably a proactive stance against the possibilities that ISPs and/or governments may encourage you to allow them to perform SSL man-in-the-middle attacks on your connection in future for tracking and advertising purposes.

Hopefully warnings appearing on users’ phones worded such as “your network may be monitored” is enough to scare off those who may have such evil intentions.

The phone is amazingly responsive. Not only that, it multitasks with ease, and the user interface is smooth.

One minor criticism is that Google Maps appears to be capped at around 15 frames per second. This is odd, as similar apps such as Google Earth run at a much more pleasing framerate.

It is probably an unfair comparison, as the Nexus 5 is so much higher specced, but overall I am finding the device much faster and more responsive (and therefore I’m more likely to grab it and use it for quick tasks) than my iPhone 4S.

Ever since the release of iOS 7, my iPhone has been frustratingly slow and unstable. Sadly, apps crashing due to low memory conditions are an almost daily occurrence.

It is unclear to me whether this is a deliberate decision by Apple in order to make their later model iPhones look better, but I find it fascinating that I find my Nexus 5 being more pleasurable to use than my iPhone 4S. Something I would not have thought possible a fortnight ago.

I’m so impressed by Android 4.4 that I’m almost dreading the impending 5.0 upgrade in the fear that Google will “do an iOS 7″ — i.e. make the device significantly less useful by making it slower and less stable.

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Marc Merlin, Jussi Pakkanen

Tue, 2014-11-18 07:28
Marc Merlin Why you should consider using btrfs, real COW snapshots and file level incremental server OS upgrades like Google does

11:35am Wednesday 14th January 2015

Marc has been using linux since 0.99pl15f (slackware 1.1.2, 1994), both as a sysadmin and userland contributor. He has worked for various tech companies in the Silicon Valley, including Network Appliance, SGI, VA Linux, Sourceforge.net, and now Google since 2002, both a server sysadmin and software engineer.

He has done hacking in various areas like mail with exim, mailman, SpamAssassin and SA-Exim, as well as maintained various linux distributions at Google and elsewhere, and given talks about some of those projects, and others at linux conferences since 2001 (LCA, OLS, Linuxcon, Usenix/LISA).

For more information on Marc's presentation, see here.



Jussi Pakkanen Making build systems not suck

2:15pm Thursday 15th January 2015

Jussi got his doctoral degree in computer science in 2006. Since then he has worked in various problem fields including mail sorting. He is currently employed by Canonical where he has worked on various parts of Ubuntu desktop and phone. In his free time he dabbles with drawing, creating computer games, photography and whatever else might catch his fancy.

For more information on Jussi and his presentation, see here. You can follow him as @jpakkane and don’t forget to mention #lca2015.

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 292: Kindergarten, return from Sydney, groceries and general malaise

Mon, 2014-11-17 22:25

I felt pretty exhausted this morning. In fact, I felt exhausted before I flew to Sydney for the weekend. It hasn't gotten any better.

I managed to get on an earlier (by an hour) flight back, which gave me a comfortable amount of time to unpack, put away the laundry and generally tidy up before picking up Zoe from Kindergarten.

After I picked her up, we popped over to the supermarket to do some grocery shopping and escape the heat, before heading home.

I had a crack at making sushi for dinner tonight. It turned out so-so. I'll tweak it a bit more next time.

Zoe seemed pretty worn out by bedtime too, and went to bed easily. I'm looking forward to a long night's sleep.

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Paul Foxworthy, Keith Packard

Mon, 2014-11-17 07:28
Paul Foxworthy Auprefs.info – A vain attempt to rescue the Australian democracy with a few hundred lines of Java Script

11:35am Wednesday 14th January 2015

Paul is an open source developer and trainer. He is a committer to the Apache OFBiz project and also currently serves as a director of Open Source Industry Australia. He is very pleased at this, his eighth LCA, to have finally done something just possibly cool enough to talk about.

Away from work, Paul tries to get away to his bush block in eastern Victoria, and to teach agile techniques to Ilke the German Shepherd.

For more information on Paul's presentation, see here. You can follow him as @ConcreteGannet and don’t forget to mention #lca2015.



Keith Packard Putting the Polish on Glamor

10:40am Wednesday 14th January 2015

Keith Packard has been developing open source software since 1986, focusing on the X Window System since 1987, designing and implementing large parts of the current implementation. He is currently a Principal Engineer with Intel's Open Source Technology Center. Keith received a Usenix Lifetime Achievement award in 1999, an O'Reilly Open Source award in 2011, sits on the X.org foundation board and is a member of the Debian Technical Committee.

For more information on Keith and his presentations, see here.

Sridhar Dhanapalan: Twitter posts: 2014-11-10 to 2014-11-16

Mon, 2014-11-17 01:26

Michael Still: Fast Food Nation

Sun, 2014-11-16 21:28






ISBN: 9780547750330

LibraryThing

I don't read a lot of non-fiction, but I decided to finally read this book having had it sit on the shelf for a few years. I'm glad I read it, but as someone who regularly eats in the US I am not sure if I should be glad or freaked out. The book is an interesting study in how industrialization without proper quality controls can have some pretty terrible side effects. I'm glad to live in a jurisdiction where we actively test for food quality and safety.



The book is a good read, and I'd recommend it to people without weak stomaches.



Tags for this post: book eric_schlosser food quality meat fast industrialized

Related posts: Dinner; Dishwasher Trout; Yum; 14 November 2003; Food recommendation; Generally poor audio quality on pod casts? Comment Recommend a book

Tim Serong: Salt and Pepper Squid with Fresh Greens

Sun, 2014-11-16 18:27

A few days ago I told Andrew Wafaa I’d write up some notes for him and publish them here. I became hungry contemplating this work, so decided cooking was the first order of business:

It turned out reasonably well for a first attempt. Could’ve been crispier, and it was quite salty, but the pepper and chilli definitely worked (I’m pretty sure the chilli was dried bhut jolokia I harvested last summer). But this isn’t a post about food, it’s about some software I’ve packaged for managing Ceph clusters on openSUSE and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server.

Specifically, this post is about Calamari, which was originally delivered as a proprietary dashboard as part of Inktank Ceph Enterprise, but has since been open sourced. It’s a Django app, split into a backend REST API and a frontend GUI implemented in terms of that backend. The upstream build process uses Vagrant, and is fine for development environments, but (TL;DR) doesn’t work for building more generic distro packages inside OBS. So I’ve got a separate branch that unpicks the build a little bit, makes sure Calamari is installed to FHS paths instead of /opt/calamari, and relies on regular packages for all its dependencies rather than packing everything into a Python virtualenv. I posted some more details about this to the Calamari mailing list.

Getting Calamari running on openSUSE is pretty straightforward, assuming you’ve already got a Ceph cluster configured. In addition to your Ceph nodes you will need one more host (which can be a VM, if you like), on which Calamari will be installed. Let’s call that the admin node.

First, on every node (i.e. all Ceph nodes and your admin node), add the systemsmanagement:calamari repo (replace openSUSE_13.2 to match your actual distro):

# zypper ar -f http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/systemsmanagement:/calamari/openSUSE_13.2/systemsmanagement:calamari.repo

Next, on your admin node, install and initialize Calamari. The calamari-ctl command will prompt you to create an administrative user, which you will use later to log in to Calamari.

# zypper in calamari-clients # calamari-ctl initialize

Third, on each of your Ceph nodes, install, configure and start salt-minion (replace CALAMARI-SERVER with the hostname/FQDN of your admin node):

# zypper in salt-minion # echo "master: CALAMARI-SERVER" > /etc/salt/minion.d/calamari.conf # systemctl enable salt-minion # systemctl start salt-minion

Now log in to Calamari in your web browser (go to http://CALAMARI-SERVER/). Calamari will tell you your Ceph hosts are requesting they be managed by Calamari. Click the “Add” button to allow this.

Once that’s complete, click the “Dashboard” link at the top to view the cluster status. You should see something like this:

And you’re done. Go explore. You might like to put some load on your cluster and see what the performance graphs do.

Concerning ceph-deploy

The instructions above have you manually installing and configuring salt-minion on each node. This isn’t too much of a pain, but is even easier with ceph-deploy which lets you do the whole lot with one command:

ceph-deploy calamari connect --master <calamari-fqdn> <node1> [<node2> ...]

Unfortunately, at the time of writing, we don’t have a version of ceph-deploy on OBS which supports the calamari connect command on openSUSE or SLES. I do have a SUSE-specific patch for ceph-deploy to fix this (feel free to use this if you like), but rather than tacking that onto our build of ceph-deploy I’d rather push something more sensible upstream, given the patch as written would break support for other distros.

Distros systemsmanagement:calamari Builds Against

The systemsmanagement:calamari project presently builds everything for openSUSE 13.1, 13.2, Tumbleweed and Factory. You should be able to use the packages supplied to run a Calamari server on any of these distros.

Additionally, I’m building salt (which is how the Ceph nodes talk to Calamari) and diamond (the metrics collector) for SLE 11 SP3 and SLE 12. This means you should be able to use these packages to connect Calamari running on openSUSE to a Ceph cluster running on SLES, should you so choose. If you try that and hit any missing Python dependencies, you’ll need to get these from devel:languages:python.

Disconnecting a Ceph Cluster from Calamari

To completely disconnect a Ceph cluster from Calamari, first, on each Ceph node, stop salt and diamond:

# systemctl disable salt-minion # systemctl stop salt-minion # systemctl disable diamond # systemctl stop diamond

Then, make the Calamari server forget the salt keys, ceph nodes and ceph cluster. You need to use the backend REST API for this. Visit each of /api/v2/key, /api/v2/server and /api/v2/cluster in your browser. Look at the list of resources, and for each item to be deleted, construct the URL for that and click “Delete”. John Spray also mentioned this on the mailing list, and helpfully included a couple of screenshots.

Multiple Cluster Kinks

When doing development or testing, you might find yourself destroying and recreating clusters on the same set of Ceph nodes. If you keep your existing Calamari instance running through this, it’ll still remember the old cluster, but will also be aware of the new cluster. You may then see errors about the cluster state being stale. This is because the Calamari backend supports multiple clusters, but the frontend doesn’t (this is planned for version 1.3), and the old cluster obviously isn’t providing updates any more, as it no longer exists. To cope with this, on the Calamari server, run:

# calamari-ctl clear --yes-i-am-sure # calamari-ctl initialize

This will make Calamari forget all the old clusters and hosts it knows about, but will not clear out the salt minion keys from the salt master. This is fine if you’re reusing the same nodes for your new cluster.

Sessions to Attend at SUSECon

SUSECon starts tomorrow (or the day after, depending on what timezone you’re in). It would be the height of negligence for me to not mention the Ceph related sessions several of my esteemed colleagues are running there:

  • FUT7537 – SUSE Storage – Software Defined Storage Introduction and Roadmap: Getting your tentacles around data growth
  • HO8025 – SUSE Storage / Ceph hands-on session
  • TUT8103 – SUSE Storage: Sizing and Performance
  • TUT6117 – Quick-and-Easy Deployment of a Ceph Storage Cluster with SLES – With a look at SUSE Studio, Manager and Build Service
  • OFOR7540 – Software Defined Storage / Ceph Round Table
  • FUT8701 – The Big Picture: How the SUSE Management, Cloud and Storage Products Empower Your Linux Infrastructure
  • CAS7994 – Ceph distributed storage for the cloud, an update of enterprise use-cases at BMW

Update: for those who were hoping for an actual food recipe, please see this discussion.

Binh Nguyen: Writing eBooks For Profit

Sun, 2014-11-16 03:15
Over the years it's been clear that I've had a propensity for writing. What hasn't been so clear was how to monetise this. Recent research has indicated that if you're a writer it isn't as difficult as you think. If you work with standard word processors and office suites then it becomes clear that it's possible basically to just type things up, export to PDF, and then publish this.

- a good example of this are the 'Building a Cloud Computing Service', 'Convergence Effect', and 'Cloud and Internet Security' (has been cleared by Australian Intelligence Services for sensitive material so it's not a problem if you're curious) reports which are now available via Amazon and Google Play Book stores for 5 USD each (pretty decent content and research for the price to be honest. Will be curious to see how this experiment goes...)

https://play.google.com/store/books/author?id=Binh+Nguyen

http://www.amazon.com/mn/search/?_encoding=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&field-author=Binh%20Nguyen&linkCode=ur2&search-alias=digital-text&sort=relevancerank&tag=bnsb-20&linkId=3BWQJUK2RCDNUGFY

CLOUD AND INTERNET SECURITY: SECURITY MATTERS [Kindle Edition]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00PKU2B4I/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00PKU2B4I&linkCode=as2&tag=bnsb-20&linkId=CELT4LN4FINTOIEE

Building a Cloud Computing Service: An Introduction to the Cloud [Kindle Edition]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00PKOZ8GM/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00PKOZ8GM&linkCode=as2&tag=bnsb-20&linkId=LDVSS3FSJBYKXHWX

CONVERGENCE EFFECT: ACCUMULATING CLOUD SYSTEMS [Kindle Edition]

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00PKVPJU0/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00PKVPJU0&linkCode=as2&tag=bnsb-20&linkId=IVWXNS67IHG3QGQS



For those who are curious here are some interesting notes:- there are some plugins and standalone applications which will allow for this but at the end of the day you need to be able to run your book through the automated checkers to be able to get anything actually posted on to the online store

http://extensions.libreoffice.org/extension-center/elaixhttp://extensions.libreoffice.org/extension-center/writer2xhtmlhttp://soft.alkinea.net/https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/EPUB/Converting_ODF_to_EPUBhttp://calibre-ebook.com/http://www.ilearnthings.com/2013/10/17/episode-12-create-epub-documents-in-libreoffice/http://www.linux-magazine.com/Online/Blogs/Off-the-Beat-Bruce-Byfield-s-Blog/From-LibreOffice-to-ePubhttp://connect.lulu.com/t5/eBooks/bd-p/ebook_formatting- another option could be paying someone to manually convert your chosen file. The problem is that you never know the quality of the work that you're going to get so I suggest going on your own- most if not all stores will take a cut of what you sellhttps://kdp.amazon.com/

https://www.apple.com/itunes/https://play.google.com/bookshttps://play.google.com/books/publish/

- though there are other options out there if you want to sell in a different wayhttps://selz.com/https://www.lulu.com/https://www.createspace.com/http://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-self-publish-an-ebook/

http://www.jeffbullas.com/2013/10/08/should-you-sell-your-ebook-on-amazon-or-your-blog/- some sites will ask for ISBN details while others will supply them for you for free

http://www.isbn.org/about_ISBN_standardhttp://www.isbn.org/http://www.nla.gov.au/the-australian-isbn-agency- it's useful to know some details about how how to categorise the book in question so that you can target the right audience in the book storehttp://www.loc.gov/standards/sourcelist/subject-category.htmlhttp://www.bic.org.uk/7/BIC-Standard-Subject-Categories/

http://editeur.dyndns.org/bic_categories/344- use proper file converters if if you can not extract properlyhttp://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/pdf-to-word-doc-converter.htmlhttp://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/word-to-pdf-converter.htmlhttps://www.acrobat.com/en_us/free-trial-download.html?trackingid=KLARA- depending on your status you may need to sign up to have a Tax File Number in the United States. There are often taxation agreements with more developed countries thoughhttp://www.irs.gov/Individuals/International-Taxpayers/Taxpayer-Identification-Numbers-%28TIN%29

http://www.irs.gov/Individuals/2013-ITIN-Updated-Procedures-Frequently-Asked-Questionshttps://www.apple.com/uk/itunes/working-itunes/sell-content/music-faq.htmlhttps://sa.www4.irs.gov/modiein/individual/please-tell.jsphttp://www.irs.gov/uac/Where-to-File-Your-Taxes--(for-Form-SS-4)https://www.apple.com/uk/itunes/working-itunes/sell-content/books/book-faq.htmlhttp://www.irs.gov/Businesses/Small-Businesses-&-Self-Employed/How-to-Apply-for-an-EINhttp://www.irs.gov/Businesses/Small-Businesses-&-Self-Employed- many book stores will require you to use specific file formats or applicationshttps://itunesconnect.apple.com/docs/UsingiTunesProducerPaidBooks.pdfhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBookshttps://www.apple.com/itunes/working-itunes/sell-content/books/book-faq.htmlhttps://www.apple.com/itunes/working-itunes/sell-content/books/https://www.apple.com/itunes/working-itunes/sell-content/- note that there are are many options/programs out there that will let you preview, manage, and convert your eBookshttp://fbreader.org/http://calibre-ebook.com/http://www.cultofmac.com/254741/how-to-add-epub-books-to-your-ipad-without-itunes-ios-tips/

David Rowe: OpenRadio Part 2 – Prototype Works!

Fri, 2014-11-14 14:30

Since the first post on the OpenRadio project Mark has been moving ahead and leaps and bounds. In just a few late nights work he has assembled and tested the radio, managed to receive off air signals, and even tested the PSK31 transmitter! Fine business Mark.

Mark writes:

Hooked it up to a real antenna tonight:

That’s me decoding actual 20m PSK31 signals!

Signal path is:

Antenna —RF—-> OpenRadio SDR —-IQ–>|Laptop|—-IQ—> Spectravue

(IQ Demod) —SSB—> fldigi

Mark managed to build the radio in 1-2 hours, including taking plenty of photos to document assembly and aid others. Now not everyone will have Mark’s radio assembly skills. However even allowing for a learning curve and a few coffee breaks we are on track for a one-day (say 6 hour) mini-conf assembly time.

A working prototype verifies the hardware design, so we are now getting ready to re-spin the PCB and start putting the kits together.

In other news Edwin from Dragino has added the OpenRadio kit to his store. We estimate the kits will be available for shipping in December. Kim, Mark and I, are still deciding if we will bring a bunch of kits to LCA, or have delegates pre-order them from Dragino. More on that shortly.

Links

OpenRadio Wiki