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Michael Still: Lock In

Wed, 2014-10-08 21:28






ISBN: 0765375869

LibraryThing

I know I like Scalzi stuff, but each series is so different that I like them all in different ways. I don't think he's written a murder mystery before, and this book was just as good as Old Man's War, which is a pretty high bar. This book revolves around a murder being investigated by someone who can only interact with the real world via personal androids. Its different from anything else I've seen, and a unique idea is pretty rare these days.



Highly recommended.



Tags for this post: book john_scalzi robot murder mystery

Related posts: Isaac Asimov's Robot Short Stories; Prelude To Foundation ; Isaac Asimov's Foundation Series; Caves of Steel; Robots and Empire ; A Talent for War Comment Recommend a book

linux.conf.au News: Earlybird registrations are now open!

Wed, 2014-10-08 18:27

The moment that you have been waiting for has finally arrived! It is with many hugs of sincere gratitude to the team that we can announce that Earlybird Registration for LCA2015 is now open.

Now is the time to chose - are you a Professional, a Hobbyist or a Student attending LCA2015? Will you be one of our fantastic army of volunteers? Go to lca2015.linux.org.au to register and buy your Earlybird ticket or register as a volunteer.

All of the information that you need is there - what you receive for your ticket price, accommodation options, THE Penguin Dinner, as well as Partners Program and creche options for those of you who are bringing your family with you. You can also register as a volunteer right now, and begin to get involved with our wonderful conference.

There have been months of anticipation, and several sleepless nights, but we are now at a truly exciting stage of the conference organising process - registration!

We look forward to seeing you all in January 2015 in Auckland.

The LCA2015 team

Simon Horms: kexec-tools 2.0.8 Released

Wed, 2014-10-08 17:26

I have released version 2.0.8 of kexec-tools, the user-space portion of kexec a soft-reboot and crash-dump facility of Linux.

This is a feature release.

The code is available as a tarball here and in git here.

More information is available in the announcement email.

Simon Horms: kexec-tools 2.0.7 Released

Wed, 2014-10-08 17:26

I have released version 2.0.7 of kexec-tools, the user-space portion of kexec a soft-reboot and crash-dump facility of Linux.

This is a feature release.

The code is available as a tarball here and in git here.

More information is available in the announcement email.

Stewart Smith: Quick MySQL 5.7.5 thoughts

Wed, 2014-10-08 10:26

It was great to see the recent announcement of MySQL 5.7.5 over at the MySQL Server Team blog. I’m looking forward to throwing this release at some of the POWER8 systems we have for a couple of really good reasons: 1) Does it work better than previous MySQL 5.7 releases “out of the box” on POWER? 2) What do the scalability improvements in 5.7.5 mean for peak QPS on POWER (and can I set a new record?).

Looking through the list of changes, I’m (casually not) surprised as to the number of features and the amount of work that echoes what we were working on in Drizzle a few years ago.

A closer look at the source for 5.7.5 may also prove enlightening, I wonder how the MySQL team is coping with a lot of the code rot legacy and the absolutely atrocious internal APIs they inherited…

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 251: Kindergarten, some more training and other general running around

Wed, 2014-10-08 09:25

Yesterday was the first day of Term 4. I can't believe we're at Term 4 already. This year has flown by.

I had a letter from the PAG to all of the Kindergarten parents to put into the notice pockets at Kindergarten first up, so I drove to the Kindergarten not long after opening time, and quickly put them in all the pockets.

Then I headed over to Beaurepaires for a free tyre checkup.

After that, I headed over to my Group Leader's house for some more practical training. I'm feeling pretty confident about my ability to conduct a Thermomix demonstration now, especially after having done my first "real" one on Sunday night.

After that, it was time to pick up Zoe from Kindergarten. It was wonderful to see her after a week away. She wanted to go to Megan's house for a play date, but Megan had tennis, so we went and did the grocery shopping first.

After the grocery shopping, we popped around the Megan's for a bit, and then went home.

I made dinner, and Zoe seemed pretty tired, so I got her to bed a little bit early.

Craige McWhirter: Post Receive Git Hook to Push to Github

Tue, 2014-10-07 22:27

I self-host my own git repositories. I also use github as a backup for many of them. I have a use case for a number of them where the data changes can be quite large and pushing to both my own and github's remote services doubles my bandwidth usage in my mostly bandwidth contrained environments.

To get around those contraints, I wanted to only push to my git repository and have that service then push to github. This is how I went about it, courtesy of Matt Palmer

Assumptions:
  • You have your own git server
  • You have a github account
  • You're fairly familiar with git
Authentication

It's likely you have not used your remote server to connect to github. To make sure everything happens smoothly, you need to:

  • Add the SSH key for your user account on your server to the authorised keys on your github account
  • SSH just once from your server to github to accept the key from github.
Add a Remote for github

In the bare git repository on your server, you need to add the remote configuration. On a Debian server using gitweb, this file would be located as /var/cache/git/MYREPO/config. Add the below lines to it:

[remote "github"] url = git@github.com:MYACCOUNT/MYREPO.git fetch = +refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/github/* autopush = true Add a post-receive Hook

Now we need to create a post-receive hook to process the push to github. Going with the previous example, edit /var/cache/git/MYREPO/hooks/post-receive

#!/bin/bash for remote in $(git remote); do if [ "$(git config "remote.${remote}.autopush")" = "true" ]; then git push "$remote" fi done

Happy automated pushing to github.

Stewart Smith: Things that are not news

Tue, 2014-10-07 09:26

The following are not news:

  • Human has genitals (which may/may not have been exposed)
  • Absolutely anything about The Bachelor
  • Anything any celebrity is wearing, anyone they’re dating or if they are currently wearing underwear.
  • any list of “top 10″ things.
  • TEENAGERS DO THINGS THAT TEENAGERS DO!

(feel free to extend the list)

linux.conf.au News: Miniconf Call for Presentations - Linux.conf.au 2015 Systems Administration Miniconf

Tue, 2014-10-07 07:28

As part of the linux.conf.au conference in Auckland, New Zealand in January 2015 we will be holding a one day mini conference oriented to Linux Systems Administration.

The organisers of the Systems Administration Miniconf would like to invite proposals for presentations to be delivered at the Miniconf. Please forward this CFP to your colleagues, social networks, and other relevant mailing lists.

This is our 9th year at Linux.conf.au. To see presentations from our previous years, see the miniconf website: http://sysadmin.miniconf.org/.

Presentation Topics

Topics for presentations could include (but are not limited to):

Systems Administration Best Practice, Infrastructure as a Service (IAAS), Platform as a Service (PAAS), Docker, Containerisation, Software as a Service (SAAS), Virtualisation, "Cloud" Computing, Service Migration, Dealing with Extranets, Coping with the shortage of IPv4 addresses, Software Defined Networking (SDN), DevOps, Configuration Management, Bootstrapping systems, Lifecycle Management, Monitoring, Dealing with BYOD, Backups in a virtual/distributed world, Security in a world where you cannot even trust your shell, Troubleshooting, Log Management, Buying Decisions, Identity Management, Multi-Factor Authentication, Web and Email management, Keeping legacy systems functioning, and other War stories from the Real World.

We strongly welcome topics on best practice, new developments in systems administration and cutting edge techniques to better manage Linux environments both virtual and physical.

Presentations should be of a technical nature and speakers should assume that members of the audience have at least a couple of years experience in Unix/Linux administration.

Format of Presentations

We are now seeking proposals for presentations at the mini-conference.

We have openings for:

  • 45 minute double-length presentations
  • 20 minute full presentations
  • 10-20 minute "Life in the Real World" presentations
  • 5-10 minute "lightning talks"

Please note, due to the single day available (and whole-LCA keynote before morning tea), we expect the majority of available timeslots to be 20 minutes long or less.

The 10-20 minute "Life the Real World" presentations are intended for people to talk about their sites or real world projects/problems. Information could include: Servers, talks, tools, people and roles, experiences, software, operating systems, monitoring, alerting, provisioning etc. The intent is to give attendees a picture of what is happening in the "real world" and some understanding of how other sites work, as well as offer you a chance to get suggestions on other tools and practices that might help your site. Discussion of "lessons learned" through really trying to use some of these things are especially welcomed.

Submitting talks

Please note that in order to give a presentation or attend the miniconf you must be registered (and paid up) for the main linux.conf.au conference. Presenting at the Miniconf does not entitle you to discounted or free registration at the main conference nor priority with registration. Unfortunately the Miniconf has no budget for sponsorship of speakers.

Submissions should be made via: http://sysadmin.miniconf.org/proposal15.html

Questions should be sent to: lca2015 at sysadmin.miniconf.org

Dates and Deadlines

To encourage early submissions priority (both of inclusion and scheduling) will be given to presentations submitted before the 19th of October 2014.

  • 2014-10-19 - Deadline for early submissions
  • 2014-10-26 - Early submissions confirmation
  • 2014-11-16 - Deadline for submissions
  • 2014-11-30 - Confirmation of all presentations
  • 2015-01-13 - Start of Miniconf and 2nd day of linux.conf.au 2015
Contact and Questions

Please see our website for more information on the miniconf, past presentations and presenting at it. If you have any questions please feel free to email the organisers at: lca2015 at sysadmin.miniconf.org

Ewen McNeill

LCA2015 Sysadmin Miniconf Convener

Stewart Smith: MariaDB 10.0 on POWER

Mon, 2014-10-06 18:26

Good news for those wanting to run MariaDB on POWER systems, the latest 10.0 bzr tree (as of a couple of weeks ago) builds and runs well!

I recently pulled the latest MariaDB 10.0 from BZR and built it on a POWER8 system in the lab to run some quick tests. The MariaDB team has done some work on getting MariaDB to run on POWER recently, a bunch of which is based off my work on MySQL on POWER.

There’s obviously still some work in progress going on, but my initial results show performance within around 10% of MySQL, so with a bit of work we will hopefully see MariaDB reach performance parity.

One interesting find was the code to account for thread memory usage uses a single atomic variable: this does not scale and does end up showing up on profiles.

I’ll comment more on the code in a future post, but it looks like we will have MariaDB being functional on POWER in an upcoming release.

Stewart Smith: MariaDB & Trademarks, and advice for your project

Mon, 2014-10-06 11:26

I want to emphasize this for those who have not spent time near trademarks: trademarks are trouble and another one of those things where no matter what, the lawyers always win. If you are starting a company or an open source project, you are going to have to spend a whole bunch of time with lawyers on trademarks or you are going to get properly, properly screwed.

MySQL AB always held the trademark for MySQL. There’s this strange thing with trademarks and free software, where while you can easily say “use and modify this code however you want” and retain copyright on it (for, say, selling your own version of it), this does not translate too well to trademarks as there’s a whole “if you don’t defend it, you lose it” thing.

The law, is, in effect, telling you that at some point you have to be an arsehole to not lose your trademark. (You can be various degrees of arsehole about it when you have to, and whenever you do, you should assume that people are acting in good faith and just have not spent the last 40,000 years of their life talking to trademark lawyers like you have).Basically, you get to spend time telling people that they have to rename their product from “MySQL Headbut” to “Headbut for MySQL” and that this is, in fact, a really important difference.

You also, at some point, get to spend a lot of time talking about when the modifications made by a Linux distribution to package your software constitute sufficient changes that it shouldn’t be using your trademark (basically so that you’re never stuck if some arse comes along, forks it, makes it awful and keeps using your name, to the detriment of your project and business).

If you’re wondering why Firefox isn’t called Firefox in Debian, you can read the Mozilla trademark policy and probably some giant thread on debian-legal I won’t point to.

Of course, there’s ‘ MySQL trademark policy and when I was at Percona, I spent some non-trivial amount of time attempting to ensure we had a trademark policy that would work from a legal angle, a corporate angle, and a get-our-software-into-linux-distros-happily angle.

So, back in 2010, Monty started talking about a draft MariaDB trademark policy (see also, Ubuntu trademark policy, WordPress trademark policy). If you are aiming to create a development community around an open source project, this is something you need to get right. There is a big difference between contributing to a corporate open source product and an open source project – both for individuals and corporations. If you are going to spend some of your spare time contributing to something, the motivation goes down when somebody else is going to directly profit off it (corporate project) versus a community of contributors and companies who will all profit off it (open source project). The most successful hybrid of these two is likely Ubuntu, and I am struggling to think of another (maybe Fedora?).

Linux is an open source project, RedHat Enterprise Linux is an open source product and in case it wasn’t obvious when OpenSolaris was no longer Open, OpenSolaris was an open source product (and some open source projects have sprung up around the code base, which is great to see!). When a corporation controls the destiny of the name and the entire source code and project infrastructure – it’s a product of that corporation, it’s not a community around a project.

From the start, it seemed that one of the purposes of MariaDB was to create a developer community around a database server that was compatible with MySQL, and eventually, to replace it. MySQL AB was not very good at having an external developer community, it was very much an open source product and not a an open source project (one of the downsides to hiring just about anyone who ever submitted a patch). Things struggled further at Sun and (I think) have actually gotten better for MySQL at Oracle – not perfect, I could pick holes in it all day if I wanted, but certainly better.

When we were doing Drizzle, we were really careful about making sure there was a development community. Ultimately, with Drizzle we made a different fatal error, and one that we knew had happened to another open source project and nearly killed it: all the key developers went to work for a single company. Looking back, this is easily my biggest professional regret and one day I’ll talk about it more.

Brian Aker observed (way back in 2010) that MariaDB was, essentially, just Monty Program. In 2013, I did my own analysis on the source tree of MariaDB 5.5.31 and MariaDB 10.0.3-ish to see if indeed there was a development community (tl;dr; there wasn’t, and I had the numbers to prove it).If you look back at the idea of the Open Database Alliance and the MariaDB Foundation, actually, I’m just going to quote Henrik here from his blog post about leaving MariaDB/Monty Program:

When I joined the company over a year ago I was immediately involved in drafting a project plan for the Open Database Alliance and its relation to MariaDB. We wanted to imitate the model of the Linux Foundation and Linux project, where the MariaDB project would be hosted by a non-profit organization where multiple vendors would collaborate and contribute. We wanted MariaDB to be a true community project, like most successful open source projects are – such as all other parts of the LAMP stack.

….

The reality today, confirmed to me during last week, is that:

Those in charge at Monty Program have decided to keep ownership of the MariaDB trademark, logo and mariadb.org domain, since this will make the company more valuable to investors and eventually to potential buyers.

Now, with Monty Program being sold to/merged into (I’m really not sure) SkySQL, it was SkySQL who had those things. So instead of having Monty Program being (at least in theory) one of the companies working on MariaDB and following the Hacker Business Model, you now have a single corporation with all the developers, all of the trademarks, that is, essentially a startup with VC looking to be valuable to potential buyers (whatever their motives).

Again, I’m going to just quote Henrik on the us-vs-them on community here:

Some may already have observed that the 5.2 release was not announced at all on mariadb.org, rather on the Monty Program blog. It is even intact with the “us vs them” attitude also MySQL AB had of its community, where the company is one entity and “outside community contributors” is another. This is repeated in other communication, such as the recent Recently in MariaDB newsletter.

This was, again, back in 2010.

More recently, Jeremy Cole, someone who has pumped a fair bit of personal and professional effort into MySQL and MariaDB over the past (many) years, asked what seemed to be a really simple question on the maria-discuss mailing list. Basically, “What’s going on with the MariaDB trademark? Isn’t this something that should be under the MariaDB foundation?”

The subsequent email thread was as confusing as ever and should be held up as a perfect example about what not to do. Some of us had by now, for years, smelt something fishy going on around the talk of a community project versus the reality. At the time (October 2013), Rasmus Johansson (VP of Engineering at SkySQL and Board Member of MariaDB foundation) said this:

The MariaDB Foundation and SkySQL are currently working on the trademark issue to come up with a solution on what rights to the trademark each entity should have. Expect to hear more about this in a fairly near future.

 

MariaDB has from its beginning been a very community friendly project and much of the success of MariaDB relies in that fact. SkySQL of course respects that.

(and at the same time, there were pages that were “Copyright MariaDB” which, as it was pointed out, was not an actual entity… so somebody just wasn’t paying attention). Also, just to make things even less clear about where SkySQL the corporation, Monty Program the corporation and the MariaDB Foundation all fit together, Mark Callaghan noticed this text up on mariadb.com:

The MariaDB Foundation also holds the trademark of the MariaDB server and owns mariadb.org. This ensures that the official MariaDB development tree<https://code.launchpad.net/maria> will always be open for the MariaDB developer community.

So…. there’s no actual clarity here. I can imagine attempting to get involved with MariaDB inside a corporation and spending literally weeks talking to a legal department – which thrills significantly less than standing in lines at security in an airport does.

So, if you started off as yay! MariaDB is going to be a developer community around an open source project that’s all about participation, you may have even gotten code into MariaDB at various times… and then started to notice a bit of a shift… there may have been some intent to make that happen, to correct what some saw as some of the failings of MySQL, but the reality has shown something different.

Most recently, SkySQL has renamed themselves to MariaDB. Good luck to anyone who isn’t directly involved with the legal processes around all this differentiating between MariaDB the project, MariaDB Foundation and MariaDB the company and who owns what. Urgh. This is, in no way, like the Linux Foundation and Linux.

Personally, I prefer to spend my personal time contributing to open source projects rather than products. I have spent the vast majority of my professional life closer to the corporate side of open source, some of which you could better describe as closer to the open source product end of the spectrum. I think it is completely and totally valid to produce an open source product. Making successful companies, products and a butt-ton of money from open source software is an absolutely awesome thing to do and I, personally, have benefited greatly from it.

MariaDB is a corporate open source product. It is no different to Oracle MySQL in that way. Oracle has been up front and honest about it the entire time MySQL has been part of Oracle, everybody knew where they stood (even if you sometimes didn’t like it). The whole MariaDB/Monty Program/SkySQL/MariaDB Foundation/Open Database Alliance/MariaDB Corporation thing has left me with a really bitter taste in my mouth – where the opportunity to create a foundation around a true community project with successful business based on it has been completely squandered and mismanaged.

I’d much rather deal with those who are honest and true about their intentions than those who aren’t.

My guess is that this factored heavily into Henrik’s decision to leave in 2010 and (more recently) Simon Phipps’s decision to leave in August of this year. These are two people who I both highly respect, never have enough time to hang out with and I would completely trust to do the right thing and be honest when running anything in relation to free and open source software.

Maybe WebScaleSQL will succeed here – it’s a community with a purpose and several corporate contributors. A branch rather than a fork may be the best way to do this (Percona is rather successful with their branch too).

Sridhar Dhanapalan: Twitter posts: 2014-09-29 to 2014-10-05

Mon, 2014-10-06 01:26