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David Rowe: OpenRadio – a one day Software Defined Radio project

Tue, 2014-11-11 11:29

For the 2015 Linux Conference, I am working with Kim Hawtin and Mark Jessop on a 1 day Open Radio Mini-conference.

In this mini-conf a classroom of people will solder together their very own software defined radio (SDR) transceivers in just a few hours. It will be capable of receiving signals on the HF radio bands (3 to 30 MHz), and short range transmission of FSK/PSK data on the 13.5 and 27 MHz ISM bands (no license required).

The project is being documented on our OpenRadio Wiki. It’s completely open source and we have published the PCB CAD files, and the parts list with Digikey/Element14 catalogue part numbers. It’s based on the soft-rock radio designs.

We have put a lot of effort into making the radio easy to build. For example a minimum of (large footprint) surface mount parts, and a simple, fast to assemble design. We have intentionally included one or two inductors and transformers to wind to give people a taste of the complete radio assembly experience. With a little supervision, the project is quite suitable for radio/electronics beginners or school age children. It’s a “crystal set” for the 21st century.

Mark has done a great job designing the radio, and we have just received the prototype PCBs:

This week we will assemble and test the first prototypes, measure how long they take to build, and noting possible snags for inexperienced builders. Then our good friend Edwin from Dragino will prepare and ship kits for the mini-conf.

The resources we create for this project (wiki, CAD files, software, kits from Dragino) will remain available after LCA. So you, your radio club, hackerspace, or even school class will have access to an easy to build a Software Defined Radio (SDR).

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Fraser Tweedale, Peter Chubb

Tue, 2014-11-11 07:27
Fraser Tweedale FreeIPA: Open Source Identity Management

2:15pm Friday 16th January 2015

Fraser is a developer at Red Hat, where he works on the FreeIPA identity management solution and Dogtag Certificate System. He is passionate about security and privacy. In his spare time, Fraser writes a lot of Haskell and patiently awaits the strongly-typed functional programming revolution.

For more information on Fraser and his presentation, see here. You can follow his as @hackuador and don’t forget to mention #LCA2015.



Peter Chubb SD Cards and filesystems for Embedded Systems

2:15pm Friday 16th January 2015

Peter has been hacking on UNIX since 1979, and has never used Windows. He currently does system (kernel and low-level) programming in a Linux environment for NICTA.

Peter's research interests include operating system algorithms for scalability, including storage, scheduling, memory management, and locking. He is also interested in systems performance measurement and optimisation.

Related hobbies include music, photography and fine wines, these also occasionally lead to research.

For more information on Peter and his presentation, see here.

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 285: Kindergarten and some tinkering

Mon, 2014-11-10 18:25

I've felt exceptionally flat today, despite having a good night's sleep. I'm blaming the heat, or treking around Saint Helena Island in the hot sun yesterday.

We biked to Kindergarten this morning for drop off, and I left the trailer there. I was feeling pretty flat just after biking there and back in the heat.

I'm trying to rig up something to bring to Kindergarten one day, which uses a Raspberry Pi and the MaKey MaKey. I spent the day fooling around with it, and not much else.

I biked back to Kindergarten to pick Zoe up. Zoe and Megan wanted to have a play date, and Jason had to run some errands, so we biked home, and he dropped Megan off.

The girls had a good time running amok, and I made a start on my first batch of fruit mince for mince pies of this Christmas season.

Jason came over to pick up Megan, and Sarah arrived not long afterwards.

Linux Users of Victoria (LUV) Announce: LUV Beginners November Meeting: Developing GUI applications

Mon, 2014-11-10 16:29
Start: Nov 15 2014 12:30 End: Nov 15 2014 16:30 Start: Nov 15 2014 12:30 End: Nov 15 2014 16:30 Location: 

RMIT Building 91, 110 Victoria Street, Carlton South

Link:  http://luv.asn.au/meetings/map

There are a few useful tools/IDEs available on Linux to develop GUI applications. They are all similar in features. In this talk Daniel Jitnah will briefly talk about how GUI applications work, and what are the toolkits available: GTK, QT and Tk as examples. He will also demonstrate how a very simple GUI application can be built. The IDEs used will be QTDesigner, Lazarus, Anjuta+Glade and Netbeans.

LUV would like to acknowledge Red Hat for their help in obtaining the Buzzard Lecture Theatre venue and VPAC for hosting.

Linux Users of Victoria Inc., is an incorporated association, registration number A0040056C.

November 15, 2014 - 12:30

read more

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Selena Deckelmann, Thomas Sprinkmeier

Mon, 2014-11-10 07:27
Selena Deckelmann What technical learners need

3:40pm Thursday 15th January 2015

Selena is a major contributor to PostgreSQL and a data architect at Mozilla. She is a director of the Python Software Foundation.

She's been involved with free and open source software since 1995 and began running conferences for PostgreSQL in 2007. In 2012, she founded PyLadiesPDX, a portland chapter of PyLadies. She founded Open Source Bridge, Postgres Open and speaks internationally about open source, databases and community. She also keeps chickens and gives a lot of technical talks.

For more information on Selena and her presentation, see here. You can follow her as @selenamarie and don’t forget to mention #LCA2015.



Thomas Sprinkmeier How to train your Minions

3:40pm Friday 16th January 2015

Thomas graduated from UniSA in 1992 as an Electronic Engineer where he was seduced by PC's early in first year.

He's been working as a Software Engineer ever since for Ebor Computing in a variety of projects, usually with heavy mathematical, signal processing and networking components, occasionally interfacing to the 'real world'. Most recently he has been working at making cars smarter an safer, on the assumption that this might be easier than upgrading drivers.

Thomas started embarassing his kids at school by taking over the class and teaching about things from pulleys to railguns, paper planes to robot programming, conducting playdough to tidal locks. Most recently he has been teaching on weekends about Raspberry Pi, Arduino and 3D printing.

For more information on Thomas and his presentation, see here.

Sridhar Dhanapalan: Twitter posts: 2014-11-03 to 2014-11-09

Mon, 2014-11-10 01:27

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 282: A day with a nanny, REIQ course, family fun night

Fri, 2014-11-07 23:25

The REIQ was offering a one day "Starting an agency" course, which seemed too good to pass up. Unfortunately, being on a Friday, and not wanting to cause Zoe to miss out on Tumble Tastics, I had to get a nanny in, instead of just sticking her in day care for the day.

After getting some recommendations from friends on Facebook, and doing price comparisons, I went with Nanny's R Us.

They had to do a last minute swap, but everything worked out fine, and even with a 30 minute late start due to traffic, I got to my course on time.

The course was well worth it, and I got some useful information that I'd been lacking to date. The course instructor also happened to be the trainer who is marking my next four units of my real estate license course, so it was nice to meet him in the flesh.

The course finished a bit earlier than the advertised time, so I used the time to run some errands I was planning on doing on Monday.

Zoe's future primary school had a "family fun night", which started at 3pm, so I'd asked the nanny to take Zoe to that and met them there at 5pm. It was a pretty good night, and Zoe had lots of fun on the rides.

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 281: Movieworld

Fri, 2014-11-07 22:26

My friends Chris and Kelly were holidaying on the Gold Coast with their daughter Alyssa, and I made plans to catch up with them at Movieworld on Thursday.

The day went super well. We timed our arrival for right on opening time, and quickly found them. Zoe and Alyssa got along really well.

The highlight of the day (for me) was that Zoe managed to be allowed onto the Scooby Doo ride in the morning. I think technically she was still a tiny bit under the height restriction, as a different attendant didn't let her on again in the afternoon.

Zoe was initially too scared by the dark in the queuing area and wanted to leave again, but the attendant talked her into going on the ride, and we had a great time. It's my favourite ride so far, in terms of length. Zoe turned around and went on it again straight away.

The other ride that we got heaps of mileage out of was the Hall of Justice ride, which Zoe has been on the first time we went, but the second time was too scared to go on. This time, her and Alyssa probably went on it 10 times in a row.

It was a really great day out, and I even got to go on the Green Lantern ride with Kelly, which was all over surprisingly quickly.

I expected Zoe to fall asleep instantly in the car on the way back, but she stayed away chattering away and playing with the Scooby Doo toy that Alyssa had bought her.

We got back with enough time to do a couple of post office runs and pick up Anshu from the ferry terminal, before Sarah arrived to pick up Zoe.

Tim Riley: New podcasts

Thu, 2014-11-06 09:27

I've enjoyed a couple of new podcasts lately:

Slate's Working podcast finds people in interesting jobs and interviews them about their workdays. It's brand new. The first episode – with Stephen Colbert – was fantastic. The show is short and dense. David Plotz as the host (along with some helpful editing, I'm sure) gets the guest talking (they usually have a lot to say) and then gets out of the way. I've appreciated finding another non-tech podcast to keep in my roster.

I still have plenty of room for good tech podcasts, though. Thoughtbot have just launched another new podcast, called The Bike Shed, covering their general experiences in web development. This looks like it will be a discussion show with regular hosts Sean Griffin and Derek Prior. They seem humble and grounded, and the first show on Sandi Metz' rules was thoughtful, and directly applicable to my work as a web developer. I'm still thinking over what they shared. I'm also appreciative they've kept the show to under 30 minutes. This makes it easy to cover on a walk into work!

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Timothy Jones, Tom Clark

Thu, 2014-11-06 08:28
Timothy Jones Hop, Skip, Jump: Implementing a concurrent interpreter with Promises

3:40pm Wednesday 14th January 2015

Tim is a PhD student at Victoria University involved in programming language design and type theory. He got his start in open-source and the PL world as a core contributor to the CoffeeScript project before becoming enamoured with Haskell, and now teaches advanced programming language concepts, has produced a few papers in the field, and occasionally writes in Agda. He also organises Pixel Jam, an annual 48-hour game jam in Wellington, during which he always builds novelty fishing simulators.

Tim has worked as part of the Grace language project over the last three years, contributing to its open-source implementation and spawning several smaller projects of his own. His most recent work has been on Hopper, a concurrent JavaScript interpreter.

For more information on Tim and his presentation, see here. You can follow him as @zmthy and don’t forget to mention #lca2015.



Tom Clark What should a Systems Administration Student's Homework Look Like?

1:20pm Wednesday 14th January 2015

Tom Clark studied mathematics and computer science at Seattle University and Dartmouth College before going on to work in various software development, IT operations, and tertiary teaching roles. Tom joined the staff of Dunedin, New Zealand's Otago Polytechnic in July of 2013 to teach in the Bachelor of Information Technology programme. He teaches papers in programming, networking, and systems administration.

For more information on Tom and his presentation, see here. You can follow him as @tom_clark and don’t forget to mention #lca2015.

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 280: A fairly quiet day, some exploration, and another Prep day

Wed, 2014-11-05 22:25

I felt absolutely trashed this morning. I was completely oblivious to Zoe coming in and sleeping in my bed at 1:20am. The first thing I knew of her being there was at around 5am when she woke me up.

We eventually got going in the late morning. I wanted to go check out a wholesale kitchen place I'd heard about, Kitchen Discounts. Like every other wholesale direct to the public place I've found out about recently, this place was also awesome. Zoe and I had a great time browsing the store.

We had lunch when we got home, and then started pulling apart the old garbage disposal, which ended up being a bit of a job. They really weren't kidding when they said it wasn't serviceable. It had some weird screws that I couldn't undo, so I drilled them all out, and we got as far as pulling the motor apart. It was definitely leaking, the bottom of the grinding plate had corroded through.

It was then time to head to Zoe's future primary school for her second Prep introductory session. Zoe scootered to school with lots of time to spare so we wouldn't be late, and I made sure Zoe was fed and watered, and things went much better than last week.

The format was pretty much the same as last week, just different fine and gross motor skills. Zoe participated much better than last week, so the challenge will be to have a smoother early departure from Kindergarten for next week's session.

On the way back home, we stopped off at the park for a play, and then continued home in time for Sarah to pick up Zoe.

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 279: Kindergarten, Grandparents Day, lots of minor annoyances

Wed, 2014-11-05 11:25

Yesterday was just full of annoyances.

Zoe had a brief wake up at 11pm. I think it was a bad dream.

I woke up at 5:30am with the light and decided to get up and get things going. Zoe on the other hand, decided to sleep in until 7:20am.

We got going to Kindergarten on the bike. The sky looked really ominous, and sure enough, it started to rain by the time we'd gotten half way up the Hawthorne Road hill. I figured we should just cut our losses and turn around and go in the car instead.

So we eventually got to Kindergarten. It was Grandparents Day, and all of Zoe's living grandparents and great-grandparents were going to make an appearance.

I got home and made a start on the current unit I'm working on for my real estate licence. After finishing Part A, I took a break, and doing some cleaning up, caused the garbage disposal to trip the earth-leakage circuit breaker, killing power to my unit and killing a multi-day backup of daedalus that I had running.

I discovered the garbage disposal has been leaking water under the sink, and that was probably what caused the circuit breaker to trip. The model I have isn't serviceable, so it needed to be replaced. After some calling around, Bunnings were the cheapest, so I picked one up and proceeded to spend the rest of the day installing it.

After much swearing, I got it installed successfully. It was not how I wanted to be spending the day.

I got it finished with enough time to clean up before driving over to Kindergarten to pick up Zoe.

Zoe wanted to watch Megan's tennis class, so we stuck around for that, and then popped into Megan's for a little bit before heading home.

Dinner was quick and easy tonight, so we used the extra time to go out for a babyccino before bedtime.

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Rafael Wysocki, Stewart Smith

Wed, 2014-11-05 08:28
Rafael Wysocki Getting more out of System Suspend in Linux

11:35am Thursday 15th January 2015

Rafael is the maintainer of the Linux kernel's core ACPI and power management code, including the core infrastructure for runtime PM, system suspend and hibernation, cpuidle and cpufreq. He works at Intel Open Source Technology Center as a Software Engineer with focus on the Linux kernel. Rafael has been actively contributing to Linux since January 2005, in particular to the kernel's suspend and hibernate subsystem, power management in general (runtime PM, PM QoS, wakeup framework etc.), hot-plug infrastructure, ACPI core and PCI core. Rafael received an MSc from the University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, in 1996 and a PhD from that faculty in 2002.

For more information on Rafael and his presentation, see here.



Stewart Smith Towards One MILLION SQL Queries Per Second

3:40pm Wednesday 14th January 2015

Stewart currently works for IBM in the Linux Technology Center on KVM on POWER, giving him a job that is even harder to explain to non-Linux geek people than ever before. Previously he worked for Percona as Director of Server Development where he oversaw development of many of Percona’s software products. He comes from many years of experience in databases and free and open source software development. He’s often found hacking on the Drizzle database server, taking photos, running, brewing beer and cycling (yes, all at the same time).

For more information on Stewart and his presentation, see here.

Stewart is also one of our wonderful Miniconf organisers; running the Developer, Testing, Release and Continuous Integration Automation Miniconf on Tuesday 13th.

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 278: Kindergarten, a trip to QCAT, and a very social swim class

Tue, 2014-11-04 08:25

Again, I failed to start the day with a run, despite that being my intention. I think I'm officially out of the running habit now, so it's going to take some work to get back into it.

I'd decided that since I'd just finished the dispute management unit of my real estate licence course, that it might be educational to go and sit in on some residential tenancy dispute hearings at the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal, so I donned my suit, hopped on a bus and rocked up at the hearing rooms in the city.

As they only publish their daily hearing list the night before, I kind of had to wing it as to the suitability. As luck would have it, Tuesday's list looks way better than Monday's list.

I ended up sitting in on one residential tenancy hearing, where the respondent was a no show, but they still proceeded with terminating the tenancy due to massive arrears. The next two were public housing hearings, which weren't relevant to me. One, where the respondent did show up, was particularly messy.

I didn't get as much of an educational benefit out of it as I would have hoped, but I did get to see how the process worked, so if I ever wind up there it won't be totally foreign to me. I may go again another time for the heck of it.

I caught a bus back home with enough time to bike down to the post office to collect some mail before biking to Kindergarten to pick Zoe up.

I'd switched Zoe's swim class from Thursday to Monday this week to free up Thursday for a trip to Movieworld to catch up with some friends visiting from Adelaide, so we biked directly to swim class, getting there a bit early. We hung out and had a snack before her class started.

One of Zoe's friends from Kindergarten was having a class at the same time, so Zoe got to say hi to her before their classes started, and then Eva and Layla arrived for classes after Zoe's. Zoe got to hang out with them individually, because they had back to back classes, and Justin and I got to have a chat. Zoe had a great old time playing with a bunch of kids, and we didn't end up leaving the pool until 4:30pm. It was a really nice afternoon.

Colin Charles: osquery is neat

Mon, 2014-11-03 20:25

Facebook recently made opensource, osquery. It gives you operating system data via SQL queries! Its very neat, and you can test this even on MacOSX (it works on that platform & Linux). It is by far the project with the most advanced functionality, linked here in this post.

I noticed that rather quickly, there was a PostgreSQL project, called pgosquery, based on Foreign Data Wrappers with a similar idea. (apparently it was written in less than 15 minutes; so a much lower learning curve than the regular MySQL storage engine interface)

I immediately thought about an older MySQL project, by Chip Turner (then at Google, now at Facebook), called mysql-filesystem-engine. This idea was kicking around in 2008. I was intrigued by hearing about this at a talk (probably at the MySQL Conference & Expo); it’s a pity no one took this further.

On a similar tangent, did you also know that there is the option to use MySQL as storage via FUSE (see: mysqlfs)? An article by Ben Martin shows some practical examples.

At its heyday, MySQL had many storage engines (maybe around 50). Wikipedia has an incomplete list. I see some engines on that list, and think that some of these folk are also creating MongoDB backends — competition. At MariaDB we are probably shipping the most storage engines of any MySQL-based distribution, however I think we could be doing an even better job at working with upstream vendors, and figuring out how to support & augment business around it.

Related posts:

  1. Plugins & Storage Engines Summit for MySQL/MariaDB
  2. Upcoming MariaDB 10.0.7 will have more engines – mroonga, OQGRAPH
  3. MariaDB 10.0.5 storage engines – check the Linux packages

linux.conf.au News: Call for Presentations for Clouds, Containers, and Orchestration Miniconf

Mon, 2014-11-03 06:28

"Software defined everything," DevOps, and cloud are driving open source further and faster than we might have imagined possible just a decade ago. Most recently, Docker containers and orchestration have opened up all kinds of new opportunities to develop, deploy, and manage software from the developer's desktop well into production.

Call for Presentations

The miniconf will focus on the open source tools and best practices for working with cloud tools, containers, and orchestration software (e.g., Kubernetes, Apache Mesos, and others). We want the leading developers working on those tools, as well as users who are deploying them in real production environments to share their knowledge and show where tools will be going in 2015.

We welcome talks on container security, creating complex applications in the cloud, working with open source Platforms-as-a-Service, container orchestration, packaging applications in containers, single-purpose operating systems, and presentations on the state and future of these applications from their developers.

Presentations should be useful to practitioners, and technical in nature. Talks should not be promotional in nature.

Format for Presentations

As we only have one day, presentation slots will be shorter than many speakers may be used to. Most talks will be 20 minutes, with the possibility for one or two longer slots for exceptionally interesting and involved topics.

Please indicate which type of presentation you're seeking:

  • 20 minute full presentation.
  • 10 minute "case study" or "state of project" presentation.
  • 40 minute double-length presentation.
Final configuration of talk/times is pending submissions received. Submitting Talks

Please see the Submission Template and submit your proposal to miniconf [at] dissociatedpress.net. Please include [LCA15 CFP] and talk title in your subject line. (For example: [LCA15 CFP] Whiz-Bang Container Wrangling with Docker and Acme Widgets.)

Note: In order to present at the miniconf, you must be registered for the main Linux.conf.au conference, and presenting at the miniconf does not entitle speakers to registration at the main conference, or any travel sponsorship.

Important Dates

  • 2014-11-15 Deadline for early submissions
  • 2014-11-20 Early submissions confirmation
  • 2014-11-25 Deadline for all submissions
  • 2014-12-1 Confirmation for submissions
  • 2014-12-2 Final speaker confirmation required
  • 2014-12-4 Final schedule announced
  • 2015-01-12 Miniconf (first day of Linux.conf.au 2015)
Schedule

The schedule will be announced on 4 December 2014.

Code of Conduct

The Clouds, Containers, and Orchestration Miniconf follows the Linux.conf.au Code of Conduct and values statement. Please do read the full Code of Conduct and Values Statement, but the bottom line is that Linux.conf.au is meant to be an event for a diverse community. Anyone – regardless of age, race, gender identity or expression, background, disability, appearance, sexuality, walk of life, or religion – should be able to attend, learn from and be inspired by other people in the Free and Open Source community.

It is important that everyone be courteous and respectful to other attendees. All public presentations should be suitable for people 12-years-old and above. Presentations may not contain:

  • Sexual or violent imagery
  • Exclusionary language
  • Language that is not appropriate for an all-ages audience

If you're in doubt, you are encouraged to confer with conference speaker liaiso

Current CFPs for lca2015 miniconfs

n or mailing list/forum moderators before your session. Questions?

If you have questions that aren't covered here, please contact Joe Brockmeier at miniconf [at] dissociatedpress.net. For fastest response, please include [LCA15 CFP] in your subject line.

linux.conf.au News: Call for Papers for Developer, Testing, Release and Continuous Integration Automation Miniconf

Mon, 2014-11-03 06:28

This is the Call for Papers for the Developer, Testing, Release and Continuous Integration Automation Miniconf at linux.conf.au 2015 in Auckland. The CFP closes at midnight on 21st November 2014.

This miniconf is all about improving the way we produce, collaborate, test and release software.

We want to cover tools and techniques to improve the way we work together to produce higher quality software:

  • code review tools and techniques (e.g. gerrit)
  • continuous integration tools (e.g. jenkins)
  • CI techniques (e.g. gated trunk, zuul)
  • testing tools and techniques (e.g. subunit, fuzz testing tools)
  • release tools and techniques: daily builds, interacting with distributions, ensuring you test the software that you ship.
  • applying CI in your workplace/project

We’re looking for talks about open source technology and the human side of things.

Speakers at this miniconf must be registered for the main conference (although there are a limited number of miniconf only tickets available for miniconf speakers if required).

There will be a projector, and there is a possibility the talk will be recorded (depending on if the conference A/V is up and running) – if recorded, talks will be posted with the same place with the same CC license as main LCA talks are.

CFP is open until midnight November 21st 2014.

By submitting a presentation, you’re agreeing to the following:

I allow Linux Australia to record my talk.

I allow Linux Australia to release any recordings of my presentations, tutorials and minconfs under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License

I allow Linux Australia to release any other material (such as slides) from my presentations, tutorials and minconfs under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

I confirm that I have the authority to allow Linux Australia to release the above material. i.e., if your talk includes any information about your employer, or another persons copyrighted material, that person has given you authority to release this information.

Please use this form http://goo.gl/forms/KZI1YDDw8n to submit your presentation.

Any questions? Contact miniconf organiser, Stewart Smith: stewart@flamingspork.com

linux.conf.au News: Call for Presentations for Open Radio Miniconf

Mon, 2014-11-03 06:28

This is an invitation for proposals for presentations for the second Open Radio Miniconf at linux.conf.au in Auckland, NZ from Kim Hawtin, the miniconf's organiser. Proposals must be received by 14 December 2014.

Hi, this is Kim VK5FJ.

In early January, I’ll be kicking off the second one day Open Radio Miniconf, in Auckland, NZ.

The Open Radio miniconf is about:

  • exploring the open source hardware of software defined radio (SDR),
  • understanding the open source software used in software defined radio, and
  • exploring the open source protocols used over the air.

We’ll start off with a build-a-thon and a little theory.

We’re using an established SDR design, reworked by Mark VK5QI and Codec2 author David VK5DGR.

We will cover the how and why of SDR, and look at encoding and decoding some old and new modes.

Later in the day we will have a session for short talks on these topics, each around 10-15 minutes.

So if you are interested in presenting, please send an email to vk5fj@wia.org.au. Please submit your proposal to present at this miniconf by 14 December 2014.

More information on registering for Linux Conf in Auckland can be found at lca2015.linux.org.au.

73 from Kim VK5FJ

Audio of Open Radio Miniconf Call for Presentations (mp3)

Sridhar Dhanapalan: Twitter posts: 2014-10-27 to 2014-11-02

Mon, 2014-11-03 01:27

Arjen Lentz: More Stories

Sun, 2014-11-02 18:25

Sorry it’s been so long, I’m still working on them! I work on around eight at a time so that’s why it’s taking so long! I will hopefully have one up in a few days!

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