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Clinton Roy: clintonroy

Sun, 2015-01-11 22:28

Work.

Flew to Auckland for my fourteenth linux.conf.au.

Somehow ended up with a ticket that didn’t give me a meal during the flight.



Filed under: diary

linux.conf.au News: Conference registration opens 2pm today #BeRegistered

Sun, 2015-01-11 10:28

Registration this year will be downstairs (level 0) at the Owen G Glenn Business School at the University of Auckland.

We look forward to seeing you there, and we even have a coffee cart in the vicinity to keep those caffeine levels up.

Map of Owen G Glenn Building (OGGB)

Follow the yellow path starting on Level 1 (see map below) to the rego desk which is on level 0 (downstairs).



The map below shows the level 0 (downstairs) of the OGGB building





Look for redshirts around the University - they will be happy to point you in the right direction!

Ben Martin: Terry 2.0: The ROS armada begins!

Fri, 2015-01-09 23:58
It all started with wanting to use a Kinect or other RGBD (Depth sensing) camera to do navigation... Things ended up slowly but surely with moving from a BeagleBone Black and custom nodejs script that I created as the heart to a quad core atom running ROS and many ROS nodes that I created ;)





The main gain to ROS is the nodes that other people have written. If you want to convert RGBD to a simulated laser scan in order to do 2d navigation then that's already available. If you want to make a map and then use it then that code is already there for you. And the visualization for these things. I'm not sure I'd have the time to write from scratch a 3d robot viewer and visualize my cut down 'fake' 2d laser scan data from the Kinect in OpenGL. But with ROS I got the joy of seeing the scan change in real time as Terry sensed me move in front of it.



I now have 3d control of the robot arm happening, including optional sinusoidal encoding of movements. The fun part is that the use of sinusoidal can be enabled or disabled without any code changes. I wrote that part as a JointTrajectory shim. For something to use smoother movement all it has to do is publish to that shim instead of directly to the servo controller itself. The publish and subscribe parts of the IPC that ROS has are very easy to get used to and allow breaking up the functionality into rather small pieces if desired.





The arm is one area that is ROS controlled, but not quite the way I want. It seems that using MoveIt is indicated for arm control but I didn't manage to get that to work as yet. The wizard only produced an arm that would articulate on one joint, so more tinkering is needed in that area. Instead I wrote my own ROS node to control the arm. It's all fairly basic trig to get the gripper at an x,y,z relative to the base of the arm. And an easy carry over to fix the gripper at a horizontal to the base no matter what position the arm is moved to. But in the future the option to MoveIt will be considered, can't hurt to have two codepaths to choose from for arm control.



As part of the refresh I updated the pan unit for the camera platform.Previously I used a solid 1/4 inch shaft with the load taken by a bearing and the gearmotor turning the shaft directly from below it. Unfortunately that setup has many drawbacks; no ability to use a slip ring, no torque multiplication, difficulty using an axle end rotary encoder IC to gain real world position feedback. The updated setup uses a 6 rpm gearmotor offset with a variable motor mount to drive a 24 tooth brass gear. That mates with an 80 tooth gear which is affixed to a hollow 1/2 inch alloy tube. As you can see at the top of the image, I've fed the tilt servo cable directly into the inside of that tube. No slip ring right now, but it is all set to allow the USB cable to slip through to the base and enable continuous rotation of the pan subsystem. So the Kinect becomes a radar style. One interesting aside is that you can no longer manually rotate the pan system because the gearmotor, even unpowered, will stop you. The grub screw will slip before the axle turns.





As shown below, the gearmotor is driven by an Arduino which is itself connected to a SparkFun breakout of the TB6612FNG HBridge IC. This combo is attached using double sided 3M tape to a flat bit of channel. Then the flat bit of channel is bolted to Terry. I've used this style a few times now and quite like it. A single unit and all it's wires can be attached and moved fairly quickly.







At first I thought the Arudino gearmotor control and the Web interface would be a bit outside the bounds of ROS. But there is an API for Arduino which gives the nice publish and subscribe with messages that one would expect on the main ROS platform. A little bit of python glue takes the ttyUSB right out of your view and you are left with a little extension from the main ROS right into the MCU. I feel that my 328 screen multiplexer will be updated to use this ROS message API. Reimplementing packeting and synchronization at the serial port level becomes a little less exciting after a while, and not having to even think about that with ROS is certainly welcome.



Below is the motherboard setup for all this. Unfortunately many of the things I wanted to attach used TTL serial, so I needed a handful of USB to TTL bridges. The IMU uses I2C, so its another matter of shoving a 328 into the mix to publish the ROS messages with the useful information for the rest of the ROS stack on the main machine to use at its will.





The web interface has been resurrected and extended from the old BBB driven Terry. This is the same Bootstrap/jQuery style interface but now using roslibjs to communicate from the browser to Terry. I'm using WebSockets to talk back, which is what I was doing manually from the BBB, but with ROS that is an implementation choice that gets hidden away and you again get a nice API to talk ROS like things such as publishing and subscribing standard and custom messages.





The below javascript code sends an array of 4 floats back to Terry to tell it where you want to have the arm (x,y,z,claw) to be located. The 4th number allows you to open and close the claw in the same command. The wrist is held horizontal to the ground for you. Notice that this message is declared to be a Float32MultiArray which is a standard message type.The msg and topic can be reused, so an update is just a prod to an array and a publish call. You can fairly easily publish these messages from the command line too for brute force testing.



var topic_arm_xyz = new ROSLIB.Topic({

   ros  : ros,

   name : '/arm/xyzc',

   messageType : 'std_msgs/Float32MultiArray'

});

var msg = new ROSLIB.Message({

  data : [ x,y,z, claw ]

});

topic_arm_xyz.publish( msg );



The learning curve is a bit sharp for some parts of ROS. Navigation requires many subsystems to be brought up, and at first I had a case that the robot model was visualized 90 degrees out of phase to reality. Most of the stuff is already there, but you need to have a robot base controller that is compatible. It is also a trap for the new players not to have a simple robot model urdf file. Without a model some parts of the system didn't work for me. I'd have liked to have won with the MoveIt control, and will get back to trying to do just that in the future. I think I'll dig around for shoe string examples, something like building a very basic three servo arm with ice cream sticks and $5 servos would make for an excellent example of MoveIt for hobby ROS folk. Who knows, maybe that example will appear here in a future post.





Clinton Roy: clintonroy

Fri, 2015-01-09 11:28

Walked to work.

There’s a construction site across the road from work with a huge rigged jackhammer, the noise is bad but the vibrations through the ground are worse.

Caught up with a friend for dinner in the city.

Bought some plastic containers for the storage cleanup in the study, they look like they’re going to work nicely, I just need to buy a few more.



Filed under: diary

linux.conf.au News: Thursday Plenary: What the Foo?

Fri, 2015-01-09 07:28

On Thursday, as part of our taking a different approach to keynote sessions for linux.conf.au 2015, we’re offering representatives from 3 leaders in open source to give us their “15 minutes of foo” to start our day. We expect this will be interesting, enlightening and entertaining.

Cooper Lees - Facebook

Representing Facebook we’ve got Cooper Lees providing an insight into the numerous open source projects they leverage every day, how they are working upstream, and innovations like the Open Compute Projects and FBOSS (their linux switch/router project).

Cooper is a Production Engineer in the Network PE team at Facebook in Menlo Park, CA, originally hailing from Wollongong, NSW, Australia. Network PE help the ‘true’ Network Engineers automate the network, not re-invent the wheel and take on existing Facebook technologies that solve their problem. Outside of being a nerd, Cooper enjoys playing Cricket, AFL (yes, in the Bay area) and Snowboarding in Tahoe as much as possible.

Carol Smith - Google

Google Summer of code is now 10 years old, and Carol Smith from Google will be provide an update on the project and how this is benefiting the open source community in our part of the world.

Carol Smith is an Open Source Programs Manager at Google. She has managed the Google Summer of Code program for 5 years. She has a degree in Journalism from California State University, Northridge.

Mark McLoughlin - Red Hat

Then from Red Hat we’ve Mark McLoughlin with some insight on some of the innovation we should see in 2015. Mark will give a whirlwind tour of recent technology shifts - covering everything from virtualization, containers, IaaS, PaaS, SDN, scale-out storage, Big Data, DevOps and more - and how they are all coming together to form the basis of today's agile data center.

Mark McLoughlin is a consulting engineer at Red Hat and has spent over a decade contributing to and leading open source projects like GNOME, Fedora, KVM, qemu, libvirt, oVirt and, of course, OpenStack. Mark is a member of OpenStack’s technical committee and the OpenStack Foundation board of directors. He contributes mostly to Oslo, Nova and TripleO but will happily dive in to any project.

Russell Coker: Conference Suggestions

Thu, 2015-01-08 23:26

LCA 2015 is next week so it seems like a good time to offer some suggestions for other delegates based on observations of past LCAs. There’s nothing LCA specific about the advice, but everything is based on events that happened at past LCAs.

Don’t Oppose a Lecture

Question time at the end of a lecture isn’t the time to demonstrate that you oppose everything about the lecture. Discussion time between talks at a mini-conf isn’t a time to demonstrate that you oppose the entire mini-conf. If you think a lecture or mini-conf is entirely wrong then you shouldn’t attend.

The conference organisers decide which lectures and mini-confs are worthy of inclusion and the large number of people who attend the conference are signalling their support for the judgement of the conference organisers. The people who attend the lectures and mini-confs in question want to learn about the topics in question and people who object should be silent. If someone gives a lecture about technology which appears to have a flaw then it might be OK to ask one single question about how that issue is resolved, apart from that the lecture hall is for the lecturer to describe their vision.

The worst example of this was between talks at the Haecksen mini-conf last year when an elderly man tried at great length to convince me that everything about feminism is wrong. I’m not sure to what degree the Haecksen mini-conf is supposed to be a feminist event, but I think it’s quite obviously connected to feminism – which is of course was why he wanted to pull that stunt. After he discovered that I was not going to be convinced and that I wasn’t at all interested in the discussion he went to the front of the room to make a sexist joke and left.

Consider Your Share of Conference Resources

I’ve previously written about the length of conference questions [1]. Question time after a lecture is a resource that is shared among all delegates. Consider whether you are asking more questions than the other delegates and whether the questions are adding benefit to other people. If not then send email to the speaker or talk to them after their lecture.

Note that good questions can add significant value to the experience of most delegates. For example when a lecturer appears to be having difficulty in describing their ideas to the audience then good questions can make a real difference, but it takes significant skill to ask such questions.

Dorm Walls Are Thin

LCA is one of many conferences that is typically held at a university with dorm rooms offered for delegates. Dorm rooms tend to have thinner walls than hotel rooms so it’s good to avoid needless noise at night. If one of your devices is going to make sounds at night please check the volume settings before you start it. At one LCA I was startled at about 2AM but the sound of a very loud porn video from a nearby dorm room, the volume was reduced within a few seconds, but it’s difficult to get to sleep quickly after that sort of surprise.

If you set an alarm then try to avoid waking other people. If you set an early alarm and then just get up then other people will get back to sleep, but pressing “snooze” repeatedly for several hours (as has been done in the past) is anti-social. Generally I think that an alarm should be at a low volume unless it is set for less than an hour before the first lecture – in which case waking people in other dorm rooms might be doing them a favor.

Phones in Lectures

Do I need to write about this? Apparently I do because people keep doing it!

Phones can be easily turned to vibrate mode, most people who I’ve observed taking calls in LCA lectures have managed this but it’s worth noting for those who don’t.

There are very few good reasons for actually taking a call when in a lecture. If the hospital calls to tell you that they have found a matching organ donor then it’s a good reason to take the call, but I can’t think of any other good example.

Many LCA delegates do system administration work and get calls at all times of the day and night when servers have problems. But that isn’t an excuse for having a conversation in the middle of the lecture hall while the lecture is in progress (as has been done). If you press the green button on a phone you can then walk out of the lecture hall before talking, it’s expected that mobile phone calls sometimes have signal problems at the start of the call so no-one is going to be particularly surprised if it takes 10 seconds before you say hello.

As an aside, I think that the requirement for not disturbing other people depends on the number of people who are there to be disturbed. In tutorials there are fewer people and the requirements for avoiding phone calls are less strict. In BoFs the requirements are less strict again. But the above is based on behaviour I’ve witnessed in mini-confs and main lectures.

Smoking

It is the responsibility of people who consume substances to ensure that their actions don’t affect others. For smokers that means smoking far enough away from lecture halls that it’s possible for other delegates to attend the lecture without breathing in smoke. Don’t smoke in the lecture halls or near the doorways.

Also using an e-cigarette is still smoking, don’t do it in a lecture hall.

Photography

Unwanted photography can be harassment. I don’t think there’s a need to ask for permission to photograp people who harass others or break the law. But photographing people who break the social agreement as to what should be done in a lecture probably isn’t. At a previous LCA a man wanted to ask so many questions at a keynote lecture that he had a page of written notes (seriously), that was obviously outside the expected range of behaviour – but probably didn’t justify the many people who photographed him.

A Final Note

I don’t think that LCA is in any way different from other conferences in this regard. Also I don’t think that there’s much that conference organisers can or should do about such things.

Related posts:

  1. A Linux Conference as a Ritual Sociological Images has an interesting post by Jay Livingston PhD...
  2. Suggestions and Thanks One problem with the blog space is that there is...
  3. Length of Conference Questions After LCA last year I wrote about “speaking stacks” and...

Chris Samuel: ARM v8 (64-bit) developer boxes

Thu, 2015-01-08 23:26

Looks like things are moving along in the world of 64-bit ARM, systems aimed at early adopting developers are now around. For instance APM have their X-C1 Development Kit Plus which has 8 x 2.4GHz ARMv8 cores, 16GB RAM, 500GB HDD, 1x10gigE, 3x1gigE for ~US$2,500 (or a steep discount if you qualify as a developer). Oh, and it ships with Linux by default of course.

Found via a blog post by Steve McIntyre about bringing up Debian Jessie on ARMv8 (it’ll be a release architecture for it) which has the interesting titbit that (before ARM had their Juno developer boxes):

Then Chen Baozi and the folks running the Tianhe-2 supercomputer project in Guangzhou, China contacted us to offer access to some arm64 hardware

So it looks like (I presume) NUDT are paying it some attention & building/acquiring their own ARMv8 systems.

This item originally posted here:



ARM v8 (64-bit) developer boxes

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 344: Lego Discovery Centre, shopping in the city

Thu, 2015-01-08 22:26

We had a really nice, busy today, much more so than I'd envisaged when we set off in the morning.

Zoe woke up at 2am and ended up in bed with me. I forgot to open her bedroom door when I went to bed, so I have no idea if that was a contributing factor or not. Her room was 26°C, so she may have been too hot. She then proceeded to have a pretty decent sleep in in my bed and not wake up until around 7am.

The plan today had been to check out the Lego Discovery Centre. It's been something I've wanted to take Zoe to for some time now, and I finally got around to booking in for a 45 minute session at 10am.

We made a pretty quick departure after breakfast, and caught the bus in, and arrived with plenty of time up our sleeves. Zoe didn't have a particularly good breakfast, and was hungry, so we hunted around for a croissant nearby.

Zoe was initially apprehensive about me leaving her there (it was a parent-less activity), but once we browsed the store before it started, she quickly became excited.

I went for a bit of a wander through Southbank and ended up in a deck chair by the river watching the world go by for half an hour. It was nice.

I went back to collect Zoe, and found her playing with a little Duplo-style remote controlled car that she'd built, and having a ball. It turned out that there were three different 45 minute sessions, all back to back. They had capacity in the next two sessions, and Zoe was keen, so I figured she could do all three. I just wish I'd remembered to bring a book. I ended up wandering over to the art gallery to amuse myself.

I came back a bit before 12:45pm to pick her up. I managed to stay out of sight for a while and observe her without her seeing me. All the kids were playing happily with a massive amount of Lego. She definitely looked like she had a good time. For a total of $36, it definitely seemed worth it. Apparently they run the sessions every school holidays, and change the theme every time. The >10 year olds were doing full on robotics with Mindstorms, which seemed very cool. I'm really excited that Zoe seems into Lego. I'm looking forward to doing lots of it with her as she gets older.

We grabbed some lunch from a convenience store next door, and then walked over to Southbank. I wanted to do a spot of shopping in the city, and for something different, I thought we could take one of the bicycle taxis over to the city. Zoe thought that was pretty cool, and it was nice to not be the one pedalling her around for a change.

We did a spot of shopping in the Myer Centre, before heading back to the bus and going home.

By the time we got home, it was time for me start dinner. Zoe watched a bit of TV, and then it was bed time. And I'd been thinking we'd be scrounging for something to do by 11:45am.

Donna Benjamin: The Great D8 Chook Raffle

Thu, 2015-01-08 21:26
Thursday, January 8, 2015 - 21:06The Drupal Association board approved a new initiative to help get Drupal 8 done.  It's called the D8 Accelerate fund. We also agreed to personally help do fundraising to support the program.  So I'm running a chook raffle.  For those of you who don't know what that is, Wikipedia gives a decent introduction.   https://www.drupal.org/governance/d8accelerate   The Drupal Association is working with the Drupal 8 branch maintainers to provide Drupal 8 Acceleration Grants. The goal is to fund work that will positively impact the release date. Drupal 8 has had over 2,400 contributors to date, which is more than any release so far. We hope that this initiative will encourage even more people to join the effort to get D8 done.   Please check out our Pozible campaign and make a pledge       

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 343: Yet another doctor visit and The Workshops Rail Museum

Wed, 2015-01-07 23:25

I started the day with a 7.5 km run, the longest distance I've managed to run lately. I'm slowly clawing my way back to 10 km.

After Sarah dropped Zoe off, I prepared a take away lunch, and we headed over to the doctor for another round of freezing the wart on her hand. She's getting really good about it now. This is one persistent wart though.

I'd made plans with Mel to go to The Workshops Rail Museum with Matthew and his brother and sister. Matthew had wanted to ride in our car, so after the doctor, I swung by Mel's place to pick him up.

We had an uneventful drive out there, and it was lunchtime by the time we arrived, so we had lunch first.

Matthew's older brother brought a friend with him, so we had five kids in total, in three different age brackets, so it was somewhat challenging keeping them all together and interested. Zoe was used to getting to go where she wanted, when she wanted, so had to learn to compromise a bit.

She was dying to get to the Nipper's Railway section and also the dining car play area and do a heap of role playing, so once we finally made it over there, she was in her element. Matthew played well with her as well.

It turned out to be a great day for going, because it was grey and drizzly outside all day.

Matthew wanted to come back to our place for a bit of a play afterwards, so we drove directly home. Both kids fell asleep on the way home, so to stretch their naps out a bit, I swung by the Valley to clear my PO box.

By the time we got home, there was less than an hour before Mel was going to pick up Matthew, and they mostly just watched a bit of TV. I used the down time to prep dinner.

After Matthew left and we had dinner, we went for a walk around the block to pick up some fruit from the Hawthorne Garage and kill some time before bedtime.

It was a nice, if somewhat tiring, day.

Michael Still: A quick walk to William Farrer's grave

Wed, 2015-01-07 21:28
This was a Canberra Bushwalking Club walk lead by John Evans. Not very long, but I would never have found this site without John's leadership, so much appreciated.



           



Interactive map for this route.



Tags for this post: blog pictures 20150107-william_farrers_grave photo canberra tuggeranong bushwalk historical grave

Related posts: A walk around Mount Stranger; Another lunch time walk; Taylor Trig; Lunchtime geocaching; Urambi Trig; Walk up Tuggeranong Hill



Comment

Clinton Roy: clintonroy

Wed, 2015-01-07 20:28

Walked to work.

Managed to finally start the Learning to Learn course! I’ve now done all the week one videos and quizzes, which I’m quite happy with. Unfortunately the first piece of assessment is due half way through LCA which is going to be..difficult.



Filed under: diary

Clinton Roy: clintonroy

Wed, 2015-01-07 12:28

Work.

Finally Mitre Ten was open when I was going past, picked up some lumber so I had something to mount the tool rack to.

Caught up with a friend who had spent Christmas and new years down in Melbourne.

Spent most of the night mounting the took rack, it took much longer than it should have. I need to reorganise one of the bookshelves, and start using it as a storage rack I think.



Filed under: diary

BlueHackers: BlueHackers at LCA 2015 (Auckland NZ)

Tue, 2015-01-06 13:12

BlueHackers will have a presence at Linux.conf.au (this year in Auckland NZ, 12-16 Jan 2015), the awesome John Dalton is organising the BoF (Birds-of-a-Feather) session one evening, and he’ll also have a stash the little BlueHackers stickers that you can put on your laptop to show your support and understanding for mental health. Some stickers may also be available at the LCA registration desk.

Have an awesome time there – unfortunately I can’t make it this year.

BlueHackers: Depression Doesn’t Make You Sad All the Time | Meloukhia.net

Tue, 2015-01-06 12:56
One of the most popular, enduring, and irritating myths about depression is that it means depressed people are sad all the time — and that by extension, people who are happy can’t be experiencing depression, even if they say they are. Read S.E.Smith’s full article: http://meloukhia.net/2014/12/depression_doesnt_make_you_sad_all_the_time

Tridge on UAVs: Embedded Linux Conference - submit a paper!

Tue, 2015-01-06 12:02

There are only a few days left to submit a paper for the Embedded Linux Conference in San Jose in March. This is the first conference with a Drone specific track organised under DroneCode.org.

Lorenz Meier and myself will both be presenting at the conference, and it will be a great opportunity for technical discussions within the DroneCode community. I'm really looking forward to meeting other members of the ArduPilot and DroneCode community and hearing about their work.

Call for Papers

The CE Workgroup of the Linux Foundation would like to invite you to make a presentation at our upcoming Embedded Linux Conference.  The conference will be held March 23 - 25 in San Jose, California.  The theme for this year is "Drones, Things and Automobiles", and we're excited to discuss some new areas where embedded Linux is really taking

off! (pun intended)



For general information about the conference, See http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/embedded-linux-conference/



For information about the call for participation, see http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/embedded-linux-conference/cfp



Please note the guidelines on the CFP page.  It's usually pretty obvious when we're reviewing the abstracts, as a program committee, who has read the guidelines and who hasn't.



ELC is the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for embedded Linux developers. The conference is open to the public.



Guidelines



Presentations should be of a technical nature, covering topics related to use of Linux in embedded systems.  Topics related to consumer electronics are particularly encouraged, but any proposals about Linux that are of general relevance to most embedded developers are welcome.



Presentations that are commercial advertisements or sales pitches are not appropriate for this conference.



Especially encouraged this year are talks in the following areas:

  • Linux in Automotive
  • Drones and Robots
  • Linux in the Internet of Things



And we'd also love to hear your proposals in the following topic areas as well:



  • Audio, Video, Streaming Media, and Graphics
  • Security
  • System size, Boot speed, and Real-Time Performance
  • Flash Memory Devices and Filesystems
  • Build Systems, Embedded Distributions, and Development tools
  • Mobile Phones, DVRs, TVs, Cameras, etc.
  • Practical Experiences and War Stories
  • Standards



Most presentation slots will be 50 minutes long, including time for questions.



Tutorials, demos, and Birds-of-a-Feather sessions may also be proposed.



The deadline for submissions is midnight January 9, 2015 PDT.



To repeat, for additional info and details for making a proposal, see http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/embedded-linux-conference/cfp



Clinton Roy: clintonroy

Tue, 2015-01-06 08:28

Walked to and from work.

Got grumpy at Mitre 10 again for closing earlier than their website says.

Metered internet at home, so can’t get much done at all.



Filed under: diary

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Florian Forster, Ian Romanick, Jean-Baptiste Kempf

Tue, 2015-01-06 07:28
Florian Forster collectd in dynamic environments

2:15pm Wednesday 14th January 2015

Florian started his first free software project in 2001 and has been active in the open source community ever since. In 2005 he started the collectd project and is still one of the project maintainers. His interests lie mainly with low-level backends and infrastructure services, though he has contributed to various window managers over the years. In his day job, he is a Site Reliability Engineer at Google.

For more information on Florian and his presentation, see here.

You can follow him as @flocto and don’t forget to mention #lca2015.

Ian Romanick Reducing GLSL Compiler Memory Usage (or Fitting 5kg of Potatoes in a 2kg Bag)

11:35am Thursday 15th January 2015

Ian Romanick is the software architect for Intel's open-source OpenGL driver, and is currently Intel’s representative to the Khronos Board. Since 2001 he has been dedicated to OpenGL on Linux. He has been doing graphics programming for 23 years, having released his first Amiga demo in 1991. Ian holds a Bachelors Degree in Computer Science from Portland State University, and is just about finished with a Masters program there. He previoulsy taught graphics programming in the Visual and Game Programming department at the Art Institute of Portland for 7 years.

For more information on Ian and his presentation, see here.

You can follow him as @IanRomanick and don’t forget to mention #lca2015.

Jean-Baptiste Kempf VideoLAN and VLC

2:15pm Thursday 15th January 2015

Jean-Baptiste Kempf is the president of the VideoLAN non-profit organization and one of the lead developers of the open source VLC media player.

Jean-Baptiste is a 31-year old French engineer and has been part of the VideoLAN community since 2005. Since then, Jean-Baptiste has worked or lead most VideoLAN related projects, including VLC for desktop, the relicensing of libVLC, the ports to mobile operating systems, and various multimedia libraries like libdvdcss or libbluray.

Jean-Baptiste has also been working in various video-related startups, and founded VideoLabs, a company focusing on open source multimedia technologies.Jean-Baptiste is the president of the VideoLAN non-profit organization and one of the lead developers of the open source VLC media player.

For more information on Jean-Baptiste and his presentation, see here.



Tim Serong: Useless Gate Memeware

Tue, 2015-01-06 00:28

There are plenty of useless gate images out there in the wild. Many of these are licensed restrictively, or it’s unclear what terms apply, making honourable use in memes problematic. To rectify this situation, I hereby offer the following four images under CC0. Enjoy.

It seems appropriate to link to a Pirate Party Australia press release here too.

Stewart Smith: Cyanogenmod with encryption on a Sony Z1 Compact

Mon, 2015-01-05 16:27

So, new personal surveillance device (it’s pink! No more BORING black phone!).

Needed to be able to load my own firmware on it and have encryption. It turns out I had to go and do things like this: http://forum.cyanogenmod.org/topic/82292-cm102-encryption-does-not-start-stuck-at-splash-screen/page__hl__+encryption#entry460839 which is, in fact, repartitioning my phone.

It’s been a while since I’ve had to do math on partitions to get a Linux installed somewhere… but if you don’t change where the filesystem is, you can’t run with encryption.

Basically, if enabling encryption isn’t working, run “adb logcat” on your computer and look for ” E/Cryptfs ( 1890): Orig filesystem overlaps crypto footer region.  Cannot encrypt in place.” if you see that, you’re going to need to boot into recovery and ” adb shell” before finding what block device /data is (check the output of “mount”) and then check the number of blocks it is in /proc/partitions before running mkfs.ext4 on it but with a device size of a few kb less than the device (I think I picked 16kb less. After doing that, everything “just worked”.

how do I deal with OTA updates? Quite easily – copy the zip to the SD card and install from there.