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lguest64 - a new breed of puppies

Over the last few years, a lot of things have happened in regards to
virtualization. After a lot of feature proposals and ideas that ended
up just being wrong, a few people were able to do get it right.
All of the previous attempts at virtualization lacked a major feature,
which was born to rule all the others: puppies!

The lguest project, started by Rusty Russell, is a recently merged
into mainline Linux hypervisor, whose logo has cute puppies, the greatest
feature it brings.
But these puppies were small, and we felt that it was time to breed a new,
bigger bunch, with more bits and a spirit and preparation to face new
challenges: lguest64. In its path to glory, it conquered SMP, which adds
a whole new list of challenges, which will be explained in this talk,
together with the benefits you can get from it. Moreover, the talk will
also cover:

* What are the differences and the similarities between paravirtualization
in the 32 and 64 bit world. One might think that the jump from 32 to
64 wouldn't be too hard. It still basically is the same architecture.
But x86_64 threw in several challenges that makes things a bit more
difficult (no segment limits, 4 level paging tables, and so on).

* Details about the mechanisms for page table management when more levels of
page tables gets into the game. x86_64 architecture uses 4 levels of
paging where as the 32 bit uses 2 levels (or 3 with PAE). Tricks are
played by lguest64 that allows for the guests to run faster, and
be SMP. But these tricks are much more complicated to pull off when
dealing with more page levels.

* The userspace launcher, how the same code works with both lguest32
and lguest64 and why it is so cool. Lguest64 tries to be compatible
with lguest32. But although lguest64 also has puppies, these puppies are
not as pedigree as the puppies in lguest32. But the setup for lguest64
tries not to verge too far from lguest32. This talk will explain
how to set up an lguest64 environment and get it running.

Finally we'll end the talk about ways to get all of these puppies into
one basket. That is, to get KVM, lguest32 and lguest64 to share
as much code as possible, and make all of the puppies play nice together.

This talk will be presented by Glauber Costa and Steven Rostedt

Project: lguest64 


Glauber Costa

Glauber Costa is a Free Software enthusiast since 2001, when he first met the ideas (and the codes). He truly believes in the importance of Free Software for the economics and social fabrics of the world. He joined this Linux thing in 2004, working for the IBM Linux Technology Center initiative in Brazil. In 2006, Glauber joined Red Hat's Virtualization team, and since then, has fun with cool things like the pvops64 port, as well as lguest64. As other highlights, there are some patches to the Xen Hypervisor and the Linux Kernel port, the pidgin (former gaim) and the GNU toolchain.

Glauber Costa

Glauber Costa is a Free Software enthusiast since 2001, when he first met the ideas (and the codes). He truly believes in the importance of Free Software for the economics and social fabrics of the world. He joined this Linux thing in 2004, working for the IBM Linux Technology Center initiative in Brazil. In 2006, Glauber joined Red Hat's Virtualization team, and since then, has fun with cool things like the pvops64 port, as well as lguest64. As other highlights, there are some patches to the Xen Hypervisor and the Linux Kernel port, the pidgin (former gaim) and the GNU toolchain.

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