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Fixing XFS Filesystems Faster

In this paper we present the results of an investigation
conducted by SGI into xfs_repair performance on commodity
and high end server class equipment to help us determine
and improve the scalability of our existing filesystem repair
techniques.

We start by describing some of the background that led
to this project and our goals for the project. Next, we
describe the benchmark methodology and hardware used in
the project. We follow this up with a series of baseline
results and observations using xfs_repair from May 2006,
SGI's first generation multithreaded xfs_repair and a
community provided multithreading patch.

We discuss the common issues that we found to adversely
affect repair performance, how the community provided
patch improved performance and why we chose not to use it.

Finally, we discuss the improvements and optimisations
that we have made and present the final results we
achieved using the improved xfs_repair. From these
results we reflect on the original goals of the project,
what we have learnt from the project and what the future
might hold.

This paper is co-authored by Barry Naujok and Dave Chinner.

Project: XFS 


Dave Chinner

Age: 32Company: SGIPosition: Principal EngineerQualifications: Bachelor of Engineering, Computer SystemsDave Chinner first became interested in filesystems when doing driver and OS development for an embedded control system. His first filesystem was a front end to a NVRAM resident database in the embedded system for a web server to use.In march 2002, he joined SGI as part of a new NFS development group. He soon became the NFS performance expert, removing bottlenecks in Irix, SGI's proprietary version of Unix.In late 2004, he moved over to the XFS development group and continued to work on Irix XFS performance issues. In early 2005, he moved to developing on the Altix platform and working to improve XFS performance on Linux. He has done work improving the high end throughput ofXFS on large systems and is now spending most of his time tryingnot to break XFS while adding new features and fixing bugs.

Dave Chinner

Age: 32Company: SGIPosition: Principal EngineerQualifications: Bachelor of Engineering, Computer SystemsDave Chinner first became interested in filesystems when doing driver and OS development for an embedded control system. His first filesystem was a front end to a NVRAM resident database in the embedded system for a web server to use.In march 2002, he joined SGI as part of a new NFS development group. He soon became the NFS performance expert, removing bottlenecks in Irix, SGI's proprietary version of Unix.In late 2004, he moved over to the XFS development group and continued to work on Irix XFS performance issues. In early 2005, he moved to developing on the Altix platform and working to improve XFS performance on Linux. He has done work improving the high end throughput ofXFS on large systems and is now spending most of his time tryingnot to break XFS while adding new features and fixing bugs.

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